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FREE BOOK ⛑ All You Can Ever Know Ï What does it mean to lose your roots within your culture, within your family and what happens when you find them Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town From early childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hopes of giving her a better life that forever feeling slightly out of place was simply her fate as a transracial adoptee But as she grew up facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn t see, finding her identity as an Asian American and a writer, becoming ever curious about where she came from she wondered if the story she d been told was the whole truthWith warmth, candor, and startling insight, Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child All You Can Ever Know is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong Finalist, National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography Longlisted for the PEN Open Book Award Named a Best Book of the Year by The Washington Post, NPR, The Boston Globe, TIME, Newsday, Library Journal, BuzzFeed, Real Simple, Paste Magazine, Chicago Public Library, Seattle Public Library, Goodreads, Shelf Awareness, Electric Literature, and An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country Nicole Chung s powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. This book moved me to my very core As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it apart is the compassion Chung brings to every facet of her search for identity and every person portrayed in these pages This book should be required reading for anyone who has ever had, wanted, or found a family This book moved me to my very core As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it apart is the compassion Chung brings to every facet of her search for identity and every person portrayed in these pages This book should be required reading for anyone who has ever had, wanted, or found a family which is to say, everyone All You Can Ever Know A Memoir is Nicole Chung s story of adoption and the search for her Korean birth family, when she becomes an expectant mother, about to start her own family Nicole was adopted by a white couple in Oregon when she was 2 months old She knew the story of her adoption well, as it was recited to her countless times throughout her childhood and adolescent years In Oregon, she rarely saw other Asian people and often felt like an outsider She also dealt with numerous questions All You Can Ever Know A Memoir is Nicole Chung s story of adoption and the search for her Korean birth family, when she becomes an expectant mother, about to start her own family Nicole was adopted by a white couple in Oregon when she was 2 months old She knew the story of her adoption well, as it was recited to her countless times throughout her childhood and adolescent years In Oregon, she rarely saw other Asian people and often felt like an outsider She also dealt with numerous questions about her adoption and being a different race Some from other kids, who meant no harm but were genuinely curious, while others both children and adults were nosy and or hurtful Nicole recounts some of these experiences as well as the questions she grew to have about her adoption as she became older She met her husband, Dan, and her desire to find her birth family grew as she learned she was pregnant, expecting their first child Much of the story revolves around Nicole s search, finding her birth family, and her quest to get to know themI wondered how often my birth family talked about me if they ever prayed for me, or wished for some way to know that I was all right Suddenly very little seemed to separate us And maybe that had always been true, especially if they really had cared about me if they had known me once As my thoughts reached out to them, all at once I could envision hundreds of gossamer thin threads of history and love, curiosity and memory, built up slowly across the time and space between us a web of connections too delicate to be seen or touched, too strong to be completely severedAll You Can Ever Know is well written The tone felt like Nicole was a close friend, confiding in you She was relatable and honest, and didn t try to paint a perfect picture Life is often complicated, and finding her birth family was not quite the image she d envisioned for so long Though she clearly needs no validation from me, I felt Nicole s mixed emotions from curiosity to anger, to sadness and acceptance, were all legitimate I couldn t imagine how I d feel with so many questions swirling in my head about the whole situation There was so much to ask, to learn, and ultimately, come to terms with This was a very heartfelt story and one that fully kept my interest Understated and contemplative, All You Can Ever Know reflects on the nuances of transracial adoption In precise prose Nicole Chung, a Korean American editor, recounts her experience of having been adopted at birth by a white couple based in rural Oregon, and considers the impact her upbringing had on her own efforts to raise a family at the heart of the memoir is the writer s quest to search for her birth family upon becoming pregnant with her first child Across each chapter she thoughtfully Understated and contemplative, All You Can Ever Know reflects on the nuances of transracial adoption In precise prose Nicole Chung, a Korean American editor, recounts her experience of having been adopted at birth by a white couple based in rural Oregon, and considers the impact her upbringing had on her own efforts to raise a family at the heart of the memoir is the writer s quest to search for her birth family upon becoming pregnant with her first child Across each chapter she thoughtfully complicates the idea of transracial adoption as being either good or bad, and delves into its complexities, at length exploring how growing up with white parents affected her sense of herself The work glides over the history of transracial adoption in America, but Chung fully renders her own story