`Download Book ⇳ Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima ☂ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Very informative book by an engineer who knows his stuff Goes through all major and some minor screw ups in painful detail I consider myself to be fairly well informed on these things, but this book taught me a lot. I totally loved this book, which sounds odd considering the topic but it is so educational, diligently researched, and well written that it is actually entertaining As a child of the Korean Conflict and Cold War, anything atomic has always been a hot topic of intrigue for me The author s research has been exceptionally wide ranging, and I feel as if I ve just finished a year s university course in the topic that s how much I ve learned. This one suffers a bit in comparison to his excellent Atomic Adventures , which I read not long ago I ll probably get back to it, unless the library calls it back first..Nope, someone else wants it.Looking at my notes Mahaffey says keeping accidents secret always makes things worse This was particularly evident in the old USSR, where admitting a mistake could cost you literally your life Or your job, and a free trip to Siberia Lots of gory det This one suffers a bit in comparison to his excellent Atomic Adventures , which I read not long ago I ll probably get back to it, unless the library calls it back first..Nope, someone else wants it.Looking at my notes Mahaffey says keeping accidents secret always makes things worse This was particularly evident in the old USSR, where admitting a mistake could cost you literally your life Or your job, and a free trip to Siberia Lots of gory details, almost all involving experienced people ignoring safety guidelines because Well, because.Power density the current fad for solar wind goes contrary to the trend since the Industrial Rev began, and is unlikely to continue he says , once people see the costs As we already have in Calif, and the Germans, and The remarkable density of politicians, and stubornness of the so called Greens, were mentioned I will add, Against stupidity, the Gods themselves rage in vain Friedrich von SchillerAlong those lines, we might mention the TX 16 EG 16, a remarkable cryogenic H bomb built in the mid 1950s Rated at 11 megatons, it weighed around 82 tons, and would fit barely in the bomb bay of a specially modified B 36 Peacemaker It was the size of a large Airstream trailer Five were built Fortunately, no calls for its use were received.And mention should be made of a helpful US govt book, published in 1945 for 1.25 Atomic Energy for Military Purposes Basically a how to primer, many, many orders were received from the USSR Many helpful photos were added in the 1946 edition It went through 8 editions and was published in 40 languages No mention of the careful reasoning behind this unprecedented show of openness, for what hd been a carefully if ineffectively guarded military secret Remarkable.3.5 stars, for as far as I read 266 of 426 I might come back to it, in the sweet by by It s been a long time since I ve read non fiction that kept drawing me back to see what happens next but Atomic is totally that book.The subject matter helps nearly every recorded radiological mishap and disaster, both famous and little known There are caves of death in the Ozark Mountains circa 1880, radium paint that killed dozens, World War II, Three Mile Island, and of course Fukushima Daiichi Mahaffey leads us through each, carefully explaining isotopes and reactions in ways that neit It s been a long time since I ve read non fiction that kept drawing me back to see what happens next but Atomic is totally that book.The subject matter helps nearly every recorded radiological mishap and disaster, both famous and little known There are caves of death in the Ozark Mountains circa 1880, radium paint that killed dozens, World War II, Three Mile Island, and of course Fukushima Daiichi Mahaffey leads us through each, carefully explaining isotopes and reactions in ways that neither make you feel stupid nor dumb down the material He states his biases right in the introduction The purpose of this book is not to convince you that nuclear power is unsafe beyond reason On the contrary, I hope to demonstrate that nuclear power is even safer than transportation by steam and may be one of the key things that will allow life on Earth to keep progressing but please form your own conclusions.I think he s done a great job of this I come away from the book thinking that nuclear power has great potential but man, we need to find a way to engineer human stupidity out of it Whether it s worth the try is left up to the reader.I cannot review this book without mentioning the footnotes don t skip them Some areinformation or links to videos, and others are tidbits that are awesome but wouldn t fit anywhere else For example It is difficult to find a cross section view of the Fermi 1 reactor that does not have a big X drawn through the refueling car It was not a popular accessory.I leave you to find the 1975 geek joke on your own At once highly technical and highly entertaining, this history of nuclear accidents comes from a guy who, like me, is a fan of nuclear power But he s not blind to its flaws or to the inevitable failings of the humans who operate nuke plants Fans of technology history books will love this one. This book was fascinating, thorough, and a keeper Read this with Command and Control if you want a complete look at accidents involving nuclear technology on both civilian and military sides The recounting of early work and experiments with radioactivity was compelling in a gruesome, morbid way. This book didn t really work for me I was not interested in the details of just how different kinds of nuclear reactors and such work, and so for large sections, I couldn t concentrate on the descriptions Since I was listening to an audiobook, I d just kind of mentally drift until the accident actually happened I was also really hoping fordescriptions of the aftermaths of the accidents, but Mahaffey usually ended the story once there was nomeltdown happening I did enjoy the stori This book didn t really work for me I was not interested in the details of just how different kinds of nuclear reactors and such work, and so for large sections, I couldn t concentrate on the descriptions Since I was listening to an audiobook, I d just kind of mentally drift until the accident actually happened I was also really hoping fordescriptions of the aftermaths of the accidents, but Mahaffey usually ended the story once there was nomeltdown happening I did enjoy the stories of very early radiation accidents and the end stories about Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima, but again, it wasn t quite the focus I was looking for And while I don t mind that Mahaffey is trying to convince the reader that nuclear power is our best resource going forward, I was really bothered that he both somewhat dismissed the problems at Fukushima Dai ichi as ultimately unavoidable because no design can prepare for all possible events and yet predicted there would never again be such a severe accident in the future I also thought he was rather cavalier about people s fears of radiation contamination I too reminded myself about the radiation exposure that comes with eating one banana a day when I lived less than 100 km north of Fukushima, but I also saw what happened to the produce grown to Fukushima s south, and I wouldn t suggest anyone eat them to make any kind of point about our society s inflated concerns For me, this was an interesting book It can be a bit technical and repetitive But that was kind of the point It is amazing how reckless we have been when researching nuclear fission And this book shows that we often have made the same mistakes over and over again when trying to perfect nuclear reactors It turns out that there have been a lotaccidents than Three Mile Island and Chernobyl And that s what made it the most interesting to me.BTW if you are dealing with nuclear reactive ma For me, this was an interesting book It can be a bit technical and repetitive But that was kind of the point It is amazing how reckless we have been when researching nuclear fission And this book shows that we often have made the same mistakes over and over again when trying to perfect nuclear reactors It turns out that there have been a lotaccidents than Three Mile Island and Chernobyl And that s what made it the most interesting to me.BTW if you are dealing with nuclear reactive materials and you see a blue flash, it s too late I am a very liberal person My views are probably far to the left of anyone who has been in the White House One point of disharmony between myself and my political compatriots is on Nuclear Power I think the promise of nuclear power is great and I think its critics concerns about safety are overblown This book is a detailed exploration of the dangers of nuclear power and the ways things can go wrong with it The public is fearful of radiation contamination and indeed radiation is harmful Th I am a very liberal person My views are probably far to the left of anyone who has been in the White House One point of disharmony between myself and my political compatriots is on Nuclear Power I think the promise of nuclear power is great and I think its critics concerns about safety are overblown This book is a detailed exploration of the dangers of nuclear power and the ways things can go wrong with it The public is fearful of radiation contamination and indeed radiation is harmful The dangers of radiation are quite real but again they are overblown.As with any technology there is the problem of safety and accidents This book explains almost every major accident and forensically shows where things went wrong A person reading this book will get a very detailed picture of nuclear power and the variety of ways it is harnessed This book provides a service to the reader by detailing the specifics of Nuclear Reactor designs, the dangers of radiation and the various safety problems involve one can get a balanced view of the risks and benefits of nuclear power The author also proposes that light water reactors have problems that make them sub optimal and that a liquid sodium reactors would be a safer bet There is a saying I would prefer the devil I know to the devil I don t know By having a detailed picture we understand how bad or good the devil is `Download Book ↟ Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima ⇯ From the moment radiation was discovered in the late nineteenth century, nuclear science has had a rich history of innovative scientific exploration and discovery, coupled with mistakes, accidents, and downright disastersMahaffey, a long time advocate of continued nuclear research and nuclear energy, looks at each incident in turn and analyzes what happened and why, often discovering where scientists went wrong when analyzing past meltdownsEvery incident has lead to new facets in understanding about the mighty atom and Mahaffey puts forth what the future should be for this final frontier of science that still holds so much promise