(KINDLE) ⚢ Eggshell Skull õ eBook or E-pub free

Informative, and compelling A memoir that serves as a reminder that women have had the short end of the stick since forever, it s mostly a massive eye opener to the limitations and inadequacies of the judicial court system Bri is fresh out of Uni becoming a Judges associate in Brisbane, working the Judges circuit and hearing endless sexual abuse and assault cases, it s during this time Bri s memories are triggered and she remembers an incidence that occurred when she was only primary school ag Informative, and compelling A memoir that serves as a reminder that women have had the short end of the stick since forever, it s mostly a massive eye opener to the limitations and inadequacies of the judicial court system Bri is fresh out of Uni becoming a Judges associate in Brisbane, working the Judges circuit and hearing endless sexual abuse and assault cases, it s during this time Bri s memories are triggered and she remembers an incidence that occurred when she was only primary school aged We hear the many horror stories and we see the inner conflict and turmoil that Bri goes through and knowing what she knows about the system doesn t make it any easier, it s rare we get a glimpse at the uncensored behind the scenes of the court system, we often only get the slick and quick court cases seen in TV all wrapped up within the hour time slot These trials usually last years and the complainants go through the absolute wringer, it s why so many drop out before seeing their time in court We see time and time again the unfairness of the system, the victimisation of the complainants and despite all the obstacles we see Bri take courage and decide to stand up and fight for justice against her abuser and take on the system.Even though Bri s own story of historical abuse is relatively unremarkable I m so glad she still came forward to make her perpetrator accountable for their actions We need to believe we can do something to stop the culture of men abusing women sexually, mentally and physically and Bri gives us a push in the right direction Giving us some comfort that the justice system although severely flawed can also work to keep these opportunist men from offending in the first place Small steps in the right direction and a brave thing to have done to fight for herself and also for all the other nameless and future victims of abuse.I applaud all the great work Bri is doing while promoting this book and wish her all the success in bringing this topic to the public eye buddy read with taryn Eggshell Skull is a harrowing insight into the Australian justice system, and it s many downfalls We follow Bri Lee first through her experiences working as a judges associate in Queensland, primarily listening to sexual assault and child sex offence cases and then into her experience taking her own childhood abuser to court There is a lot of heavy subject matter so I give a content warning for rape and sexual assault often described explicitly, unusual cruel se buddy read with taryn Eggshell Skull is a harrowing insight into the Australian justice system, and it s many downfalls We follow Bri Lee first through her experiences working as a judges associate in Queensland, primarily listening to sexual assault and child sex offence cases and then into her experience taking her own childhood abuser to court There is a lot of heavy subject matter so I give a content warning for rape and sexual assault often described explicitly, unusual cruel sex acts, description of self harm and suicide ideation, depression and anxiety, emotional distress, discussions of substance and alcohol abuse, use of slurs Basically this book is, often, a lotJudges tell juries if a defendant lies, it doesn t necessarily mean he s guilty, but if a woman is crying as she dials triple zero after being raped, she might just be putting on a show Eggshell Skull is hard to read at times It s heavy and many of the cases Bri Lee describes in detail are hard to read about But because of it, this memoir always felt extremely honest and authentic, and this was one of it s greatest strengths The majority of this book focusses on the Australian legal system and examining it s many flaws This included the extreme difficulty of complainants in sexual offence cases to secure conviction, especially if they experience multiple marginalisations I found Bri Lee s insights extremely thoughtful and well articulated, and I could feel her own frustration with the system myself while reading this Bri Lee has such a strong narrative voice that really carries this book Her thoughtful and insightful commentary into the justice system, and her introspection really grabbed me from the beginning Following her narration, I found myself easily pulled into the book and compelled to just keep on reading a feeling I don t often get with non fiction like I do with fiction I also appreciated how Lee was able to balance personal sections of this book with theinformative and factual parts about the legal system The balance of legal lingo and personal storytelling was spot on Eggshell Skull is emotionally harrowing and difficult to read at times, but ultimately an important and timely book I found this so informative and interesting whilst also engaging on a personal level and it definitely gave me a lot to reflect on Bri Lee is a fantastic writer, and if fiction writing is ever something she pursues I would love to read it Eggshell Skull is raw, but it is one of those books I wishpeople would read Wow Laced with heartbreak and strength, this is one of the best nonfiction books I ve read all year. This book should be compulsory reading for all men, but especially those in the law Bri Lee s ferociously frank and fearless memoir exhorts us to honestly appraise our accepted wisdom, examine our institutional discrimination against women, and correct our unconscious disrespect of their experience I can t commend this highly enough Read it immediately. I went to the Holland Park arrests court further down the road from the Brisbane Supreme Court and saw so many injustices occurring left and right An Asian man who could not understand or speak English was spoken to in loud and jarring English that he had to come back next week He kept shaking his head saying he couldn t understand and all the Magistrate did was speak louder to him Further, as I sat there in Court 1, I understood that people who do not have access to legal representation are I went to the Holland Park arrests court further down the road from the Brisbane Supreme Court and saw so many injustices occurring left and right An Asian man who could not understand or speak English was spoken to in loud and jarring English that he had to come back next week He kept shaking his head saying he couldn t understand and all the Magistrate did was speak louder to him Further, as I sat there in Court 1, I understood that people who do not have access to legal representation are constantly thrown under the judicial bus compared to those who do There s so much to talk about Like how 1 in 3 lawyers suffer from mental health issues numbers from a speech by Justice Kirby on Daniel Solomon who committed suicide a few years back , or how the law school only promotes a certain kind of thinking and try to weed out those who are creative Eggshell Skull by Bri Lee kept me emotionally invested until the end I found the the passages about law and the legal process set out very well and insightful They are written in a way that everyone can understand A lot of the process and locations were familiar to me because I too live in the same city as Bri so that is how I found myself picking this up when it came out However, in my opinion the writer herself writes dramatically to the point of cringe In other words, the execution is lacking To not get me wrong I am not belittling the horrible things she s experienced and witnessed firsthand, but the thing is, she has artificially created pause in places of the book that needs none And one of the things I hate the most in books is when people end chapters usually them going to sleep Everyone deserves to understand the problems that our legal systems face, and she has written about it in a way that no one else has done before It s relevant to me as well because it is set in Brisbane and it s a recently published novel about the legal landscape now She is very brave to tackle a giant whale sized issue, but it does not negate the fact that the entire memoir falls short on its impact There is a certain sense of privilege permeating through her words despite her battle with mental illness and depression and lack of self esteem, she is still privileged Here s the SPOILER Don t read on if you don t want to be spoiled Bri is still able to go through the legal process without a hitch and win her case when people belonging to other minorities do not She highlights the suffering of minorities, but then never really delves deeper into their issues I find myself asking What is her message here Is it that she won because she was the right type of female that the system listens to If that is the case, then she should identify that Because this is real life and the dragon is immortal and really isn t a dragon but Scylla with thousands of limbs and heads and you can t consider these issues in isolation anyRacism exists in the legal sphere and I have experienced it myself A lecturer told me in first year that they were amazed that I could speak and write English well I grew up in Australia, so imagine how annoyed I felt at that and eventually, they told me to stop going to the university if I wantedhelp on how to write legally I had no idea how to write legally, I just came out from high school I understand that this is her memoir, and her sexual assault is serious and she is so strong to stand up for herself, but the novel promoted itself like an amazing piece of life changing, earth shattering, never before seen novel, and that s what I expected it to be So let me set it straight it s a memoir, about a typical white female Australian who goes through the legal process and tackles issues relating only to that specific type of women If that s your thing, then that s your thing I liked that she wrote a book to make people think about the legal sphere and that s really important to get the ball rolling But I wish it could have been somethingperhaps a little bitabout her time in law school even to provide a backdrop on how someone like her could win her case when others cannot go to the police, sit there confidently and be taken seriously All of the above review is my opinion only I absolutely hate this book I stopped reading when I had only 3 chapters left I totally gave up She is overwhelmingly privileged I couldn t go on I don t even want this damn book sitting on my bookshelf. By the time I finished this book I was angry Not angry for the author or at the justice system, but angry at the author for her overwhelming blindness to her privilege The first half of the book was interesting, where she appropriated the truly shocking experiences of marginalised and disadvantaged women and children who were victims of sexual crime These are the true victims of the memoir where the justice system fails them over and over again, and yet their experiences are being appropria By the time I finished this book I was angry Not angry for the author or at the justice system, but angry at the author for her overwhelming blindness to her privilege The first half of the book was interesting, where she appropriated the truly shocking experiences of marginalised and disadvantaged women and children who were victims of sexual crime These are the true victims of the memoir where the justice system fails them over and over again, and yet their experiences are being appropriated for the author s benefit in order to set the scene for her fight for justice I truly hope a portion of her book sales are being donated to organisations supporting women and children of domestic and sexual violence, to at least give something back to them for using their stories for personal financial gain Towards the end of the book, it was glaringly obvious why the author was able to have success with her court case because she is privileged She is already fluent in the justice system through being immersed in it, she went to a private school and the State s best law school, she lived in New York for a few months prior to commencing a coveted Judge s Associate role, and she has strong and stable family and a long term supportive partner providing the important emotional and financial support It d make for a richer andrealistic memoir if she wasnuanced about her privilege, by comparing her success in navigating the justice system to the privileges she holds that many of the other victims do not have have starsIf there is one non fiction based memoir title you should read this year, make Eggshell Skull, by the incredibly brave Australian woman Bri Lee a priority This is a scathing insight into the Australian justice system and the process of gaining a judicial result for a sexual assault claim It is an incredibly raw and brave account of a young woman who finds herself on the other side of the justice system.Bri Lee is the central figure behind Eggshell starsIf there is one non fiction based memoir title you should read this year, make Eggshell Skull, by the incredibly brave Australian woman Bri Lee a priority This is a scathing insight into the Australian justice system and the process of gaining a judicial result for a sexual assault claim It is an incredibly raw and brave account of a young woman who finds herself on the other side of the justice system.Bri Lee is the central figure behind Eggshell Skull When this seething memoir opens, Bri is a bright eyed and bushy tailed young graduate, who takes up a position as a judge s associate in the Queensland District Court system She soon becomes disillusioned with the judicial system and Australian society It is this sense of disillusion which leads Bri to finally seek justice for a crime that was committed against her as a young girl Bri comes from a family with strong values, her father was a well respected and hardworking policeman Bri was inspired to follow a career in the legal system, graduating as a successful law student Her subsequent position as a judge s associate opened Bri s eyes to a litany of city and country based crimes across Queensland What struck Lee about many of the cases she witnessed was the treatment of females, in particular the injustice that they received This added fuel to the fire, a fire that Bri kept buried deep within her for many years Finally, at breaking point, Bri decided to face her fears head on and reveal her assault This revelation sets in motion of a chain of events, as Bri first conveys her ordeal to loved ones, then the police and finally the courts, over again This living nightmare is a testament to Bri Lee s courage, as well as determination to seek retribution for the past It is a past that has defined Bri s sense of self.Author Krissy Kneen has endorsed the back cover of Eggshell Skull with the comment, a page turner of a memoir, impossible to put down I am with Krissy Kneen all the way, it is unusual for me to whip through a memoir as quickly as I did with Eggshell Skull But perhaps this is a clue to the brave and brutal story that I was confronted with in my reading of Eggshell Skull I couldn t turn my eyes away from this book and I continued to read just onepage, until I was done.I have nothing but admiration for Bri Lee It takes guts to finally confront a sexual assault that occurred to this young woman when she was just a primary school aged young girl It angered me that the perpetrator of Bri s crime got away with his actions for so long Her assailant also had the opportunity to commit further misappropriation towards other victims and he never acknowledged his crime, or impact of his crime These type of stories need to be unearthed and shared I applaud Allen and Unwin for backing this book and I hope that it paves the way for future works of this subject matter.What amazed me about this particular case was the fact that Bri Lee is an astute and highly intelligent woman, well versed in Australian law When Lee found herself on the other side of the law, she had difficulty getting her voice heard and accepted in the court system Bri Lee s case is just a drop in the ocean in a world full of unresolved sexual assault and harassment claims These cases often do even make it as far as a report to police, let alone in court and rarely is the perpetrator apprehended for their crime It is a sad state of affairs and I actually dread to think of how many cases along the same lines as Bri Lee s case will never be aired.What also shocked me about this book was the sections in the first part of Eggshell Skull Bri Lee gives the reader a no holds back insight into her life as a first year judge s associate It is incredibly raw, honest and detailed Bri reveals her personal struggles with an eating disorder, self harm attempts and her many instances of self loathing It is hurtful to read at times, that a young woman with so much promise and a great deal to live for would feel this way As the memoir progresses, which Bri Lee hints at before the big reveal, we begin to form a picture of why her thoughts are directed this way I was taken aback by the nature of the cases Bri attended to with her endearing judge Just how many sexual assault, rape, harassment, child abuse and neglect cases are dealt with on a daily basis by the Queensland district court system astounds me It is hard to read about these cases without developing nasty taste in your mouth, along with the heartbreak of those who find themselves at the centre of these cases Bri Lee also illuminates the day to day tasks of a judge, a judge s associate, lawyers, bailiffs and jurors It makes for a fascinating read.The second half of Eggshell Skull is where Bri Lee really comes into her own She has moments of elation and utter lows All the while she is supported by her family, partner and outside agencies Bri does the hard yards, relaying her painful story times many times over and she has to painstakingly wait for her time in court She must be patient and determined to stick to her cause, despite many working on her case requesting that Bri walk away or take an inferior resolution to settle the case I have all the time in the world for this courageous woman, who did beat the system and will hopefully inspiresexual abuse victims to speak out Eggshell Skull is an informative memoir that holds revolutionary claim.Eggshell Skull is book 108 of the Australian Women Writers Challenge (KINDLE) ì Eggshell Skull ⚟ EGGSHELL SKULL A well established legal doctrine that a defendant must take their victim as they find them If a single punch kills someone because of their thin skull, that victim s weakness cannot mitigate the seriousness of the crime But what if it also works the other way What if a defendant on trial for sexual crimes has to accept his victim as she comes a strong, determined accuser who knows the legal system, who will not back down until justice is done Bri Lee began her first day of work at the Queensland District Court as a bright eyed judge s associate Two years later she was back as the complainant in her own case This is the story of Bri s journey through the Australian legal system first as the daughter of a policeman, then as a law student, and finally as a judge s associate in both metropolitan and regional Queensland where justice can look very different, especially for women The injustice Bri witnessed, mourned and raged over every day finally forced her to confront her own personal history, one she d vowed never to tell And this is how, after years of struggle, she found herself on the other side of the courtroom, telling her storyBri Lee has written a fierce and eloquent memoir that addresses both her own reckoning with the past as well as with the stories around her, to speak the truth with wit, empathy and unflinching courage Eggshell Skull is a haunting appraisal of modern Australia from a new and essential voice Lee s relentless reportage of her year as a judge s associate made me remember jury duty a truly harrowing experience I cannot imagine how anyone sits in court rooms every single day and hears all the vile ways humans hurt each other How that experience triggered and inspired her to seek justice for herself was moving Where this book was most successful was in the moments Lee interrogated the justice system as it relates to women and crimes against women The fact it was so difficult for Le Lee s relentless reportage of her year as a judge s associate made me remember jury duty a truly harrowing experience I cannot imagine how anyone sits in court rooms every single day and hears all the vile ways humans hurt each other How that experience triggered and inspired her to seek justice for herself was moving Where this book was most successful was in the moments Lee interrogated the justice system as it relates to women and crimes against women The fact it was so difficult for Lee to bring her own case to court given her understanding of the system is heart breaking The system is failing survivors of sexual assault I would have liked a bitattention paid at a sentence level and feelpolished writing would have really elevated this