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And i would like to able to continueTo let what is inside of meWhich is, which comes from all the music that i hearI would like for that to come outAnd it s like, it s not really me that s comingThe music s coming through meWhen it comes to creating something, I d argue that whatever inspired it is just as important as the sheer talent it took to execute it Sure, having the aptitude for a particular craft is crucial to the process, an integral cog in the creative wheel But what spawned the ide And i would like to able to continueTo let what is inside of meWhich is, which comes from all the music that i hearI would like for that to come outAnd it s like, it s not really me that s comingThe music s coming through meWhen it comes to creating something, I d argue that whatever inspired it is just as important as the sheer talent it took to execute it Sure, having the aptitude for a particular craft is crucial to the process, an integral cog in the creative wheel But what spawned the idea More often than not, a creation s influence comes from elsewhere their own favorites It s part of why the whole recommended if you like option exists in the first place Now this is by no means a condemnation on originality But I d assert that even the most original artists your Bowies, your Basquaits, your Burtons have their own influences, and I d be damned if those influences didn t play an essential role in perfecting their own genius Take Radiohead, for instance Sure, the English band had been initially dismissed perhaps rightfully so as another Britpop retread But as their career progressed, so too did their sound, their ambition My interest level, as well, for I went from casual fan to full blown obsessed in the matter of a college semester I collected b sides and imports, voraciously read interviews More importantly, I learned of what inspired their ever evolving sound it led me down my first of countless wormholes of discovery, opening my eyes to artists I may not have found otherwise It s how I became hip to critically acclaimed yet criminally underrated older artists such as Can or Talk Talk, as well ascontemporary under the radar acts like Liars or Sigur Ros It s also how I was introduced to DJ Shadow All it took was a Guitar World article candidly mentioning what influenced the unique, off kilter drum loop that kickstarted my all time favorite record, OK Computer The opening track, Airbag , is underpinned by a beat built from a seconds long recording of Selway s drumming The band sampled the drum track with a sampler and edited it with a Macintosh computer, inspired by the music of DJ Shadow, but admitted to making approximations in emulating Shadow s style due to their programming inexperience At the time, Airbag was like nothing I d ever heard before And yet somewhere out west, a recent college grad named Josh Davis had been making the music that had inspired it for several years And the best part Its creation wouldn t have been possible without its influences Literally For those unfamiliar with DJ Shadow s work, his compositions are primarily made up of samples, his creative process all but defining the notion of the whole being greater than the sum of the parts Yet despite this literal borrowing, Davis s output is entirely original, if not groundbreaking And there s no greater example of this than his landmark debut, Endtroducing I m just as transfixed by the record today as I was during my first listen So, you can imagine my excitement upon learning of Eliot Wilder s account of Shadow s masterpiece as part of the 33 1 3 series Unfortunately, my enthusiasm would soon falter Oh, the irony that a work depicting something so totally inventive would amount to be wholly unoriginal How exactly Because Wilder literally phones it in, the majority of his submission a transcription of a phone interview it slike two dudes talking, one waythan the other betwixt he and DJ Shadow Despite my misgivings to this format, there was still potential for something interesting after all, Davis is intelligent, articulate and passionate about his craft And yet Wilder appears ill prepared, half of his questions being responses to Davis s answers, offering little room for introspection from either end What s , Wilder doesn t even inquire about Endtroducing until page 70 of 98 , and when doing so only focuses on a handful of its tracks I wasn t necessarily expecting a song by song breakdown What I was expecting, though, was something a littleinspired than a glorified magazine QA I suppose the one saving grace to this account was learning about Davis s background his Northern California upbringing, his early acquired eclectic taste in music, his proclivity for crate digging in concert with an affinity for scratching acting as the two headed impetus to his craft I ll never not be interested in an artist s approach, even when presented in a lackluster format such as Wilder s piece If anything, it speaks to the staying power of the artist s output its freshness, as well as its timelessness.There s no denying DJ Shadow s Endtroducing is both fresh and timeless Unfortunately, Eliot Wilder s take on the record is anything but This book is a 100 page interview with the DJ himself, as opposed to thetypical 33 1 3 entry, which serves as abbreviated band history and New Historical exegesis of a specific album Not that there s anything wrong with that see The Village Green Preservation Society for a good one , and in fact, I would ve liked a littleof it It s still illuminating, but less so on the album itself, so on the development of a talented young collagist.These books are all a bit silly, though. Okay, so the good part of this contribution to the 33 1 3 series is that it s done in an interview format I really like first hand accounts so I like that DJ Shadow was involved and it was all a question answer vibe The bad part of this contribution to the 33 1 3 series, was that the interview segment was boring I wanted a certain level of introspection out of a question answer situation and maybe that s not what this was intended to be, but real talks, why not I think that would have been n Okay, so the good part of this contribution to the 33 1 3 series is that it s done in an interview format I really like first hand accounts so I like that DJ Shadow was involved and it was all a question answer vibe The bad part of this contribution to the 33 1 3 series, was that the interview segment was boring I wanted a certain level of introspection out of a question answer situation and maybe that s not what this was intended to be, but real talks, why not I think that would have been notable All I got was dry facts that detailed Shadow s process to create Entroducing and some super dry facts about his upbringing with a small sneak peek into his anxiety I would have liked WAYof that last part Weird, I know, that I would want to hear him talkabout anxiety, etc., but I really was hoping foranalysis of his mental state at the time of Endtroducing s creation I wanted all of that in addition to the technical aspects of the record s creation He gets a little into talking about his mental health towards the end when he speaks about the reception to the record but not so much re the inspiration of the record For such a dope, inventive album that has levels of cerebral complexity, Shadow s description of its creation was basic and way too every day for me Like what were you feeling b I felt like he reserved the passion, that shit was missing in action Which is weird because it s there in heavy doses on the record from the first cut to the last I m sad to say that this was kinda mundane, but I was looking for introspection, self examination I actually really loved the movement through the writer Eliot Wilder s childhood exploration of music in the Introduction I liked itthan it s follow up question answer segment Eliot Wilder s expressions on his venture into The Beatles and growing up listening to his radio s offerings was charming It reminded me that the joy of music and music discovery is one of the most necessary agents of socialization for young minds It opens up your whole world It cannot be understated and Eliot Wilder tastefully shared his experiences, which I appreciated I m working my way through the 33 1 3 series, so I m gonna keep it pushing to the next one Must read for any fans of the album, DJ Shadow, or hip hop in general The introduction is a nice backdrop for the material that follows which, though in interview form, is almost entirely Shadow s words He talks about growing up, recounts each step of the journey, sets Endtroducing in its historical context and gives insights into how it came together He recalls everything with incredible detail and offers plenty of nuggets which answer some of the how s and why s This is a real behind Must read for any fans of the album, DJ Shadow, or hip hop in general The introduction is a nice backdrop for the material that follows which, though in interview form, is almost entirely Shadow s words He talks about growing up, recounts each step of the journey, sets Endtroducing in its historical context and gives insights into how it came together He recalls everything with incredible detail and offers plenty of nuggets which answer some of the how s and why s This is a real behind the curtain look at one of the most important and inimitable albums ever made, told through the words of the creator himself Thoroughly enjoyable read that will make you want to revisit every bit of early Shadow you can get hold of There s always a danger lingering in the background for 33 1 3 releases While it s great that each book is written by a different author, I feel there s a lack of cohesion from album to album Obviously I don t expect one music journalist to write every single entry, but the genres often differ wildly with each book Add that some people can be hopelessly devoted to an album I m looking at you, OK Computer and you can have a series that generates anything from one star to five in a matter of There s always a danger lingering in the background for 33 1 3 releases While it s great that each book is written by a different author, I feel there s a lack of cohesion from album to album Obviously I don t expect one music journalist to write every single entry, but the genres often differ wildly with each book Add that some people can be hopelessly devoted to an album I m looking at you, OK Computer and you can have a series that generates anything from one star to five in a matter of two or three books.As it happens, I m hopelessly devoted to Endtroducing it s been one of my favourite albums for years and years When I first laid ears on it, I barely recognised any samples Now, ten years on, I ve picked up on a lot from simply going through life and hearing music What this does is add a layer that has already been there from the beginning It s like being given a piece to a puzzle with an ever changing end result Thethings change, theit stays exactly the same I was excited to read this because I had hoped the author shared my opinions.Do they I m not sure Probably This 33 1 3 book is particularly interesting because it may as well be one long interview, as opposed to a critical collage of perspectives As with all 33 1 3 books, this is saturated with personal bias, something which draws a lot of negative acclaim but something I don t think you can avoid when it comes to talking about music Usually when an author writes for 33 1 3, they re already a fan of the album so of course there s going to be bias If I was to be let rip on an album I loved, you d be sick of me by the tenth page I would also expect somebody to be a fan when they decide to read it, or else, what s the point So long as it doesn t detract too much, I don t have a problem This doesn t go as far as some books, which can be obnoxious quite frankly.The interview approach is refreshing, for sure I ve heard from others than some books in the 33 1 3 series are nothingthan ego trips from music journalists This book at least gives DJ Shadow room to talk and breathe, adding perspective to an album already rich in narrative and history The samples skip about, paying no attention to the decades that may divide them You can tell DJ Shadow clearly loves music, so much so that he used what already exists to create something fresh and pioneering If you ve read 33 1 3 books that came across as heavy, this will be a welcome change It feelslike a chat rather than a lecture, and that s what something as subjective as music should be handled as Good long form interview with DJ Shadow Could ve beenfocused on the album in question, though. Overall, this is pretty good, but it definitely serves as a prime example of Jason Guriel s argument that critics need to stop getting personal in their critical pieces you can check out Guriel s piece here Wilder spends 15 pages rambling about his own life before he finally mentions the album that ostensibly serves as the subject of this book From there, he dives into the interview with DJ Shadow, which is interesting, but again I wish there was mor Overall, this is pretty good, but it definitely serves as a prime example of Jason Guriel s argument that critics need to stop getting personal in their critical pieces you can check out Guriel s piece here Wilder spends 15 pages rambling about his own life before he finally mentions the album that ostensibly serves as the subject of this book From there, he dives into the interview with DJ Shadow, which is interesting, but again I wish there wasof a focus on Endtroducing, which is sort of given short shrift until about the last third of the book All in all, I found this to be a fairly interesting read, but I wish it had beenalong the lines of the volume on Paul s Boutique, withattention paid to the titular album *Free E-pub ☠ Endtroducing... ↟ What resonated about Endtroducing when it was released in , andwhat makes it still resonate today, is the way in which it loosensitself from the mooring of the known and sails off into an unchartedterritory that seems to exist both in and out of time Josh Davis is notonly a master sampler and turntablist supreme, he is also a seriousarcheologist with a world thirsty passion what Cut Chemist refers to asJosh s spidey sense for seeking out, uncovering and thenripping apart the discarded graces of some other generation thatpile of broken dreams and weaving them back together into atapestry of chronic bleakness and beauty Over the course of severallong conversations with Josh Davis DJ Shadow , we learn about his earlyyears in California, the friends and mentors who helped him along theway, his relationship with Mo Wax and James Lavelle, and the genesisand creation of his widely acknowledged masterpiece, Endtroducing This is a great book about one of my favorite albums.It s a very long interview between Wilder, an obviously knowledgeable music critic, and DJ Shadow They must have corresponded for months over email Don t expect a blow by blow dissection of the tracks, though, as I did It s actually mostly about Shadow s growth as a musician and an artist which is of course also a worthy topic There s a bit of oh I sampled that funk record here or those drums are from the old track by but I wou This is a great book about one of my favorite albums.It s a very long interview between Wilder, an obviously knowledgeable music critic, and DJ Shadow They must have corresponded for months over email Don t expect a blow by blow dissection of the tracks, though, as I did It s actually mostly about Shadow s growth as a musician and an artist which is of course also a worthy topic There s a bit of oh I sampled that funk record here or those drums are from the old track by but I would have liked a littleIt was a great and inspiring read either way.I d definitely ready any other book in this series though I didn t see any other albums as awesome as this one Its still a great album after almost 15 years It doesnt sound dated in any way and I still listen to it on a regular basis But I wish I could say the same for the book Its the worst I have read in this series Its basically a decent interview with Shadow and then there is a pointless long intro where the author writes about himself There is no indepth info about the songs or anything Its too bad that such a great album gets such a crap book Read the book about Reign in blood instead, a fan Its still a great album after almost 15 years It doesnt sound dated in any way and I still listen to it on a regular basis But I wish I could say the same for the book Its the worst I have read in this series Its basically a decent interview with Shadow and then there is a pointless long intro where the author writes about himself There is no indepth info about the songs or anything Its too bad that such a great album gets such a crap book Read the book about Reign in blood instead, a fantastic read