.FREE PDF ⚉ Last Woman Hanged ☲ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

Louisa Collins was a working class girl married off to Charles Andrews, a man quite a few years older nevertheless, Andrews was a good husband and the couple went on to have ten children Life in the young colony of Sydney was tough and Louisa liked to relax by having a drink and dancing In order to make ends meet, the family took in boarders, including one of Charles workmates, Michael Collins in December 1886 Not long afterwards, the rumour mill was rife regarding Louisa and Collins and af Louisa Collins was a working class girl married off to Charles Andrews, a man quite a few years older nevertheless, Andrews was a good husband and the couple went on to have ten children Life in the young colony of Sydney was tough and Louisa liked to relax by having a drink and dancing In order to make ends meet, the family took in boarders, including one of Charles workmates, Michael Collins in December 1886 Not long afterwards, the rumour mill was rife regarding Louisa and Collins and after a confrontation with Andrews, Collins was thrown out In January, Andrews drew up a will, and then quite soon fell ill with severe gastric pains and vomiting subsequently dying in February 1887 By April 1887, the merry widow had married her boarder, Collins, who proceeded to gamble away the family s money inherited from Louisa s first husband Within a year of the marriage, Collins also fell ill displaying the same torturous symptoms as Andrews He died in July 1888.Suspicions were raised by Louisa s neighbours, Collins body was exhumed and the coroner s verdict was death by arsenic poisoning Louisa was remanded to stand trial for Collins murder At this point, it s important to be aware both men had worked as wool washers where the skins were treated with arsenic Arsenic can poison by means in addition to ingestion It was also used widely by households in the colony as a form of bait and Louisa s ten year old daughter would go on to swear she had seen a box of Rough On Rats bait in their kitchen Louisa Collins first stood trial for the murder of her second husband, Michael Collins When the jury came back, unable to reach a verdict, she was remanded to stand trial a second time for his death A new jury returned with the same answer unable to reach to reach a verdict in fact many of the jurors found her not guilty Where you would expect at the stage, Louisa would be freed, instead and quite unbelievably, she was then remanded to stand trial for her first husband, Charles Andrews In this third trial, what should have been inadmissible evidence was brought into the testimony Louisa s young children were also used as witnesses against her This trial also returned with a no verdict reached summation and even though appeals were lodged, she was remanded for a fourth time this time, reverted to the murder of Michael Collins The reader will really feel like the judiciary is determined to find Louisa guilty at any cost At its closure, she was found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging.The women of the colonies of Sydney and Melbourne were incensed by the four trials and the final verdict petitions for her release were written and signed by thousands Even people who thought her guilty felt her sentence should be commuted to life in prison True separation of power became blurred, as the matter of Louisa s sentence was hotly debated in Parliament But nothing would save Louisa she was hanged on 8th January in 1889 Louisa s death was not a smooth execution she was hanged a hangman who had a reputation for botching the job and he lived up to his reputation with Louisa s hanging But the story does not end there You really need to read this book to see how this single event was the catalyst for the emergence of the Suffragette movement in Australia What a well written, unemotionally told and extensively researched book A fascinating read which kept me glued to the pages A well deserved 4 rating Fascinating I have been looking at this book at Big W for a number of weeks and finally just decided to buy it, price be damned It turned into a great read, extremely well researched and although a little biased, I too felt the injustice of this story I actually have never heard it before, but it s a story that deserves to be told.Firstly, how crazy is it that this woman faced four trials to determine her guilt, and yet it was only the last that brought her to the gallows and to death Then t Fascinating I have been looking at this book at Big W for a number of weeks and finally just decided to buy it, price be damned It turned into a great read, extremely well researched and although a little biased, I too felt the injustice of this story I actually have never heard it before, but it s a story that deserves to be told.Firstly, how crazy is it that this woman faced four trials to determine her guilt, and yet it was only the last that brought her to the gallows and to death Then the bumbling that occurred during said trials, as well as the obvious prejudice of judges and jury at times It made for compulsive reading I honestly don t know if she was guilty or not, but the trials at least to me were handled remarkably poorly I adored how well researched this book was, down to small details The author has gone to pains to track down descendants and pieces of trivia that made this a great bookAnyone interested in Australian history should track down a copy highly recommended Excellent Charged with the murder of her 2nd husband, Louisa Collins appeared at her 1st trial on 6th August 1888 wearing a blue dress, a grey cape and a hat For reasons known only to herself, she also carried in her hands a small sprig of the highly perfumed flower Heliotrope, locally known in Sydney these days by its common name Cherry Pie It transpires that she held a sprig of these flowers throughout each of her trials.I was intrigued by this detail and wondered what the significance mi Excellent Charged with the murder of her 2nd husband, Louisa Collins appeared at her 1st trial on 6th August 1888 wearing a blue dress, a grey cape and a hat For reasons known only to herself, she also carried in her hands a small sprig of the highly perfumed flower Heliotrope, locally known in Sydney these days by its common name Cherry Pie It transpires that she held a sprig of these flowers throughout each of her trials.I was intrigued by this detail and wondered what the significance might be, a quick google search reveals some interesting folklore regarding this flowerOther folkloric tales show this plant s place in rituals For instance, if you pick a heliotrope blossom in the month of August and use it for good, then good things will come back to you if, on the other hand, you use it with bad intentions, the wickedness will be turned around on you ten foldNote the month of August being relevant here.This interesting legend in Witchipedia According to Greek legend, the nymph Clytie was in love with the God Helios or Apollo , but he did not return her affections or left her for another woman Clytie pined away, spending all of her days gazing at the sun, not eating, resting and talking to anyone Helios finally turned her into a flower and she continues to this day following his movements through the sky.http www.witchipedia.com herb helio In the Language of Flowers dictionary it is said to symbolize Devotion This review may contain spoilers OMG Thank heavens we have moved on somewhat since those early days of Australia sclearly flawedjustice system.Guilty or innocent, this was such a biased witch hunt This woman, Louisa Collins, was subjected to four murder trials between August 1888 and December 1888, in order to secure the desired guilty verdict, and sentence her to the hangman s gallows.So many things were not even considered in her Louisa s defense, such as the very real and possible prospect of another culprit being involved.All of the so called evidence was circumstantial, yet any other likelihood of her innocence was of seemingly no consequence to her defense.Only an open and shut verdict would suffice, she was to be found either guilty or innocent.Four different Judges, four different Prosecutor s and four different Juries.The first three trials were dismissed because the jury couldn t reach a decision, even after being sent back to reconsiderin one case only one person thought her guilty.Because the colony was still so small and jurors were to be picked only from a pool of men who held what were deemed respectable occupations and positions in the community, butchers for example, didn t qualify by the fourth trial they were running seriously short of prospective jury candidates.So we must surmise that, not just for the sake of rapidly diminishing appearances of propriety, but for the imperative need of a resolution due to the already severely diminished jury pool, that an acceptable verdict must be achieved anon.So many questions arise from these conditions and decisions It would be intriguing to see this case played out in a mock up court room today.Sadly, a woman lost her life in a most cruel and invidious way as the eventual result of that severely flawed justice system.Incredible to believe that this was happening here a mere 127 years ago I was not convinced of Louisa s guilt on all charges, however, guilty or innocent, I believe her treatment should be considered as a most shameful and gross injustice in Australia s early history.Louisa Collins now claims the infamous title of being the Last Woman to be hanged in New South Walesfor crimes that she may, or may not have committed.She was 41 years old, had already lost two husbands, and she had given birth to 10 children..who now had no parents Such a travesty.Much of this story was also devoted to describing the gallows, their function and efficacy, and also the blatant incompetency of the appointed hangman of the time who was equally renowned for his incompetence and regular insobriety, yet incredibly, he retained this position for many years.The awful, graphic details of the actual event of Louisa s hanging were also described from records of the time.In her acknowledgements the author, Caroline Overington states that this is the first book written about Louisa Collins It is clear that she has done her homework and put a lot of time into researching this case, and has included copious endnotes making for easy referencingfor those of us that like to know the details.This book is about so muchthan the dreadful fate of Louisa Collins, it talks about the conditions of the time..especially for women..and their position or lack thereof in the overall scheme of things About their lack of a right to vote and the move to attain that, as a basic human right It also discusses to suffragette and temperance movements, and the brave women that first spoke out to afford us those basic rights we now enjoythanks be to them.This is a book that should appeal to anybody, especially students or history buffs with a fascination for crime and the justice system in early Australia, especially in Sydney.What terrific learning experience this book is I easily give it 5 s and highly recommend it In the 1800 s in New South Wales Australia a woman was tried for murder not once not twice but four times It took 48 men and it was men, because women were not allowed to sit a jury to convict Louisa Collins and condemn her to death by hanging She was convicted on circumstantial evidence Her attorney stood beside her through all 4 trials, with 3 separate judges, but he failed to object to perceived evidence when and where he should have He allowed two of her 7 living children to te In the 1800 s in New South Wales Australia a woman was tried for murder not once not twice but four times It took 48 men and it was men, because women were not allowed to sit a jury to convict Louisa Collins and condemn her to death by hanging She was convicted on circumstantial evidence Her attorney stood beside her through all 4 trials, with 3 separate judges, but he failed to object to perceived evidence when and where he should have He allowed two of her 7 living children to testify against her Evidence was submitted as factual even though it had never been proven Her crime murdering the man she loved with arsenic This trial began a movement within the women Many petitions asking that her sentence be commuted to life in prison were backed by women, some of them the very wives of the men who found her guilty From there the women continued and it started a pre suffragett movement in women s rights This book put you in the courtroom in the gaol jail and in the pain of the husband It reiterated the lack of women s freedoms at that time, their powerlessness, the poverty of the era, and the injustice by refusal of the men in power to save the life of Louisa Collins This is both the personnel story of one womans life and also a political novel, featuring human rights, legal boundaries and moral standings The epilogue traces each of the people in this story, right up to the current day, and the living relatives of Louisa Collins Also included are pictures of Louisa, her second husband Michael Collins, some of her children and the man who had a final say, Premier Sir Henry Parkes, who could have saved her life and chose not to Wow What a great read, I still not 100% sure that Louisa Collins was guilty, I find it appalling that there was four trials I learnt at lot about the times and the goings on I feel that she was a real character and maybe not totally innocent or slightly mad Love the writing of Caroline Overington An absolute must read Anyone that lives in Sydney would find it interesting because of the descriptions of the places such as Botany etc. An interesting look at a very unfortunate and shameful incident in Australian history, but I found the book to be a little padded there was a great deal of contemporary comment from newspapers and letters which was included, but seemed to add little to the story.It s extraordinary that this poor woman was subjected to 4 separate trials and I found myself wondering just how many they were prepared to put her through to get the desired verdict.The history of the women s suffrage movement toward An interesting look at a very unfortunate and shameful incident in Australian history, but I found the book to be a little padded there was a great deal of contemporary comment from newspapers and letters which was included, but seemed to add little to the story.It s extraordinary that this poor woman was subjected to 4 separate trials and I found myself wondering just how many they were prepared to put her through to get the desired verdict.The history of the women s suffrage movement towards the end was fascinating perhaps that should have been part of another book altogether .FREE PDF ♶ Last Woman Hanged ☮ Two husbands, four trials and one bloody execution Winner of theDavitt Award for Best Crime Book Non fiction the terrible true story of Louisa Collins In January , Louisa Collins, ayear old mother of ten children, became the first woman hanged at Darlinghurst Gaol and the last woman hanged in New South Wales Both of Louisa s husbands had died suddenly and the Crown, convinced that Louisa poisoned them with arsenic, put her on trial an extraordinary four times in order to get a conviction, to the horror of many in the legal community Louisa protested her innocence until the endMuch of the evidence against Louisa was circumstantial Some of the most important testimony was given by her only daughter, May, who was justyears old when asked to take the stand Louisa Collins was hanged at a time when women were in no sense equal under the law except when it came to the gallows They could not vote or stand for parliament or sit on juries Against this background, a small group of women rose up to try to save Louisa s life, arguing that a legal system comprised only of men male judges, all male jury, male prosecutor, governor and Premier could not with any integrity hang a woman The tenacity of these women would not save Louisa but it would ultimately carry women from their homes all the way to Parliament HouseCaroline Overington is the author of eleven books of fiction and non fiction, including the top selling THE ONE WHO GOT AWAY psychological crime novel She has said My hope is that LAST WOMAN HANGED will be read not only as a true crime story but as a letter of profound thanks to that generation of women who fought so hard for the rights we still enjoy today Praise for LAST WOMAN HANGED The story she tells is a useful challenge to any tendency to simple moral indignation Beverley Kingston, Sydney Morning Herald This is a fascinating book, a terrific read, and an excellent reminder of who tells the stories, and whose stories are forgotten Frances Rand, South Coast Register what s interesting is Caroline Overington s even handed appraisal of Collins s alleged crime s that led her to become the last woman hanged in New South Wales inLaunceston Sunday Examiner The story of Louisa Collins is amazing It s true that truth is stranger than fiction and Caroline Overington did not let Louisa down by her in depth research to bring Louisa s story to modern day audiences Louisa s story has been pieced together from widely sourced documents that together provide an in depth portrayal of the last woman hanged in NSW and the impact of her story on society.I loved the way that the author included the story of a number of influential characters including the hang The story of Louisa Collins is amazing It s true that truth is stranger than fiction and Caroline Overington did not let Louisa down by her in depth research to bring Louisa s story to modern day audiences Louisa s story has been pieced together from widely sourced documents that together provide an in depth portrayal of the last woman hanged in NSW and the impact of her story on society.I loved the way that the author included the story of a number of influential characters including the hangman, the judges, Louisa s supporters and the politicians.Great Australian drama that provides incredible insight to a period of Australian history I was expecting so muchfrom this potentially interesting story It was repetitive and riddled with quotes which neededediting I felt the epilogue in particular was padded out with information of people only tangentially involved with Louisa her story I was expecting so muchfrom this potentially interesting story It was repetitive and riddled with quotes which neededediting I felt the epilogue in particular was padded out with information of people only tangentially involved with Louisa her story On 8 January 1889, Louisa Collins, a 41 year old mother of ten children, became the first woman hanged at Darlinghurst Gaol and the last woman hanged in New South Wales Caroline Overington has researched the story behind Louisa Collin s four, yes you read that correctly, four trials for murder One of the three trials was in relation to the deaths of her first husband Charles Andrews in January 1887, the cause according to the doctor who signed his death certificate was Acute Gastritis, three w On 8 January 1889, Louisa Collins, a 41 year old mother of ten children, became the first woman hanged at Darlinghurst Gaol and the last woman hanged in New South Wales Caroline Overington has researched the story behind Louisa Collin s four, yes you read that correctly, four trials for murder One of the three trials was in relation to the deaths of her first husband Charles Andrews in January 1887, the cause according to the doctor who signed his death certificate was Acute Gastritis, three were in relation to her second husband Michael Collins the man she married just three months after the demise of the first Michael Collins died on 8 July 1888 of what the post mortem indicated was arsenic poisoning.This book not only takes us through the suffering of both men as they writhed for days in agony with stomach pain but the job of the somewhat incompetent hangman Nosey Bob, those who presided over the trials and most importantly the clamour of women s voices to commute the death sentence passed when Louisa was finally declared guilty in respect of the death of Michael.As with all these reconstructions of historical crimes one of the main questions is was Louisa guilty of the crime that meant that she hanged from the neck until she was dead It s certainly far from clear cut, but that isn t the main thrust of the book which is farabout women s rights at a time they were treated as children Louisa hanged on order of laws made by parliament of which she had no say in She lived a life forever in the fear of abject poverty if her husband didn t work, she, and her children, wouldn t eat and there was no way out of the never ending cycle of child birth, the last of Louisa s babies had recently died when just a few months old.Louisa isn t the most sympathetic of characters, but once the death sentence had been passed those women who did have a voice, through their husbands and fathers, began clamouring for the sentence to be commuted Although some of these were unconvinced of her guilt, by no means all were There was after all the unpalatable truth that whilst thirty six men had been unable to reach a consensus of guilt, Louisa was hung on the verdict of the final trial Al of this carried out in the space of a few short months with a dwindling population of suitable jurors Quite why there was so much will to retry this woman until the verdict of guilt was reached is unclear,but e can assume that powerful men were clearly determined that their presumption of guilt was the right one.There is a fair amount regarding the politics of New South Wales at the time of the trials which to be honest meant little to me sitting as I do well over one hundred years later on the other side of the world, but they sound very similar to politics everywhere with the distinction that Australia was at this time trying to move away from being a penal colony to a fully fledged independent country.This was a fascinating read although at times I felt that I was bludgeoned by the repletion of information that this was a man s world and Louisa had no say in the laws I understand the argument but if Louisa did set about to murder two husbands in such an agonising fashion, she probably understood that if her crimes were discovered that the law was going to act After all hanging wasn t a rarity, although in New South Wales the last women prisoner had her sentence commuted.The afterword takes us through the next few years where due to their vociferous campaigning Australian women were the first in the world to get the vote and spread the word to the rest of the world, including Britain We also catch up with what happened to Louisa s children and other key members of the case A satisfactory ending to a book which gives a factual account of Louisa s life and trials while bringing to the forefront a fight that would live long after her body had been cut down from the scaffold.Last Woman Hanged is from my own collection of books, chosen not for the historical factor of this true crime but following my read of the author s I Came to Say Goodbye which I thoroughly enjoyed