~BOOK ♠ Leaving Mother Lake: A Girlhood at the Edge of the World ⚖ PDF or E-pub free

~BOOK ♅ Leaving Mother Lake: A Girlhood at the Edge of the World ⚔ This widely acclaimed memoir transports us to the remote reaches of the Himalayas, to a place the Chinese call the country of daughters, to the home of the Moso, a society in which women rule According to local tradition, marriage is considered a foreign practice property is passed from mother to daughter a matriarch oversees each family s customs, rituals, and economies In this culture a young girl enjoys extraordinary freedoms but the impulsive, restless Namu is driven to leave her mother s house, to venture out into the larger world, defying the tradition that holds Moso culture together Leaving Mother Lake is a book filled with drama, strangeness, and beauty Yet for all the exoticism, Namu s story is a universal tale of mothers and daughters the battles that drive them apart and the love that brings them back together Yang Erche Namu grew up in an isolated area of the Himalayas where relationships play out rather differently than most of the world considers to be the norm For the Moso also spelled Mosuo , matriarchs rule, and individual couples do not move into houses of their own instead, male lovers visit their female lovers at night for as long as both are amenable, and all children stay with their mother.Not a ton has been written about the Moso, and this is the only memoir that I know of by somebody w Yang Erche Namu grew up in an isolated area of the Himalayas where relationships play out rather differently than most of the world considers to be the norm For the Moso also spelled Mosuo , matriarchs rule, and individual couples do not move into houses of their own instead, male lovers visit their female lovers at night for as long as both are amenable, and all children stay with their mother.Not a ton has been written about the Moso, and this is the only memoir that I know of by somebody who grew up in the culture It s an excellent piece due in no small part, I am sure, to the work of Christine Mathieu and filled in a lot of holes for me I read some about the Moso people in a Women s Studies course a few years ago, and watched a documentary, but I loved having thispersonal take An excellent reminder, at least for me, of how much experiences can vary.Yang herself seems likesomething of a character Mathieu smooths her out a bit, I think do some Googling maybe after you read the book and you ll see what I mean , and has enough understanding of China in general and Moso culturespecifically to be able to weave in a ton of detail I definitely recommend the afterword, though Yang says something interesting in the final word she describes this story of her youth as filtered through another s imagination 289 It s a great way to look at ghostwriting, I think.Anyway, I found myself somewhat less interested once Yang was away from her family still interested, mind just not as much , whichI think, based on Internet searching, would perhaps not surprise Yang too much That said, it s a complicated story on many endsher mother being a rebel in her own way flawed but very relatable relationships with her family both clearly loving many parts of her culture but also yearning to find outabout what lay beyond it The Moso also spelled Mosuo are a small minority who live in southern China near Tibet They are famous for the unique relationship between the sexes practiced by most groups Women manage not just the household but the domestic economy and work while men are often away trading or herding yaks The women of a family reside in the same house, each with a separate room where they receive visits from men they are free to choose relationships are usually transitory, and jealousy is discouraged The Moso also spelled Mosuo are a small minority who live in southern China near Tibet They are famous for the unique relationship between the sexes practiced by most groups Women manage not just the household but the domestic economy and work while men are often away trading or herding yaks The women of a family reside in the same house, each with a separate room where they receive visits from men they are free to choose relationships are usually transitory, and jealousy is discouraged However, political and religious power has remained in the hands of men, either the old feudal lords, the Communists who vanquished them, or the gurus and lamas who provide spiritual guidance The religion itself seems to be indigenous with a Buddhist overlay This is an autobiography, written with an anthropologist, of the most famous of the Moso, a woman who left her family at fourteen for Shanghai It contains much of interest and many moving scenes, especially those that show the Communist cadres from the majority Han people trying to change the Moso The visiting cadres try to convince the Moso to adoptconventional sexual relationships, including marriage, by carting in a portable projector and showing a movie of people in local dress suffering from syphilis The widow of the feudal lord, a member of the Han ethnicity herself and remembered as both dignified and compassionate, spends her last years as a brutalized farmworker A lama the narrator calls him the Living Buddha is restored to his spiritual status by the Communists but must wear the then ubiquitous Mao jacket and cap The description of life with the solitary yak herders or of Moso ceremonies or the disorientation and poverty of a rural child in the megalopolis are effective and touching But there are hints of the woman who this girl would become, the writer of numerous autobiographies herself, a performer and celebrity, cantankerous and adept of publicity stunts Even as a girl, she was difficult and even violent, beating a Moso suitor and a roommate in Shanghai, and she was rude to a fellow urban Moso with whom she corresponded on discovering that he was short and not handsome He later became a foremost scholar on Moso culture and language So there are glimpses of the egotistical personality in this account of her youth, and what is left out makes the portrait look self serving Still, to my mind, a memorial to and defense of a minority trying to keep its identity in a huge, overpowering nation one that actually refuses to recognize them as a separate ethnicity, instead grouping the Moso as part of a separate group, the Naxi is never out of order and as such the book has great value Perhaps matriarchy is not what we expect, one of Mathieu s professors points out What we call matriarchal culture is usuallyaccurately matrilineal culture, which is neither inherently matriarchal nor egalitarian He thinks the difference lies mainly in that patrilinial societies accept the domination of women by their fathers and husbands and in matrilineal society they are bullied by uncles and brothers.This problemitizaion of viewing the Moso people s seemingly female driven culture thr Perhaps matriarchy is not what we expect, one of Mathieu s professors points out What we call matriarchal culture is usuallyaccurately matrilineal culture, which is neither inherently matriarchal nor egalitarian He thinks the difference lies mainly in that patrilinial societies accept the domination of women by their fathers and husbands and in matrilineal society they are bullied by uncles and brothers.This problemitizaion of viewing the Moso people s seemingly female driven culture through a feminist lens was indistinctly referenced in the leadership role the family men and local Lamas played in the funeral of Namu s grandmother It wasdirectly addressed in Namu s descriptions of menstruation shame, the isolated experience of childbirth and the Moso s male dominated public presence, wherein the culture is represented solely by men through trade and travel.Living so closely to the bridal abduction rituals and other obvious male dominant practices of the Yi culture helps highlight a Moso feminism that allows a woman to control household politics, take and refuse lovers and have uncontested custody of her children Namu s own sense of agency, which gives her confidence to go out alone into the world, belies a level of egalitarianism, either of the culture at large or of her mother s own particular headstrong leadership Of course, even her mother s instruction is culturally conditioned as evidenced in her determination for Namu follow her model of women s roles The younger woman feels trapped by this expected role, elucidated in her mother s declaration You re a woman, you belong in the house, to the village Your power is in the house Your duty is to keep the house, to be polite to old people and to serve food to the men Namu instead pursues her own unorthodox ambition and succeeds at her dream It seems evident, though not explicitly acknowledged that she would have been unable to follow through with her plan had it not been for her mother having paved the way already This is the most interetsing culture I have ever heard about The Moso are a Chinese minority near the Sichuan Yunnan provinces border who have a matrilineal society, where property is handed down through female lines There is no marriage, but men go to visit their lovers at their house and then leave in the morning If a woman wants to end the relationship, she hangs his pack near the front gate as a message Children are raised in the mother s house with their uncles as the male presence T This is the most interetsing culture I have ever heard about The Moso are a Chinese minority near the Sichuan Yunnan provinces border who have a matrilineal society, where property is handed down through female lines There is no marriage, but men go to visit their lovers at their house and then leave in the morning If a woman wants to end the relationship, she hangs his pack near the front gate as a message Children are raised in the mother s house with their uncles as the male presence This is a story of a girl who grew up in a remote village but dreamed of exploring the world beyond The Chinese don t officially recognize the Moso people, they group them in with the nearby Naxi aka Nahki , where women do have a strong role in society, but the Naxi have a completely different language, religion, and customs.On my recent trip to China, we were close to this area, but did not make it to Lake Lugu, where this story takes place Makes me want to go back Read this book I first learned of Chinese pop singer Namu when she was quoted in the New York Times as offering to marry French President Nicolas Sarkozy So, I Googled her and this book was a prominent mention there, and in a recent New York Times profile.This is a fascinating look at an old Chinese Tibetan ethnic group so isolated Namu writes of dirt floors, and the pig living in the courtyard before he s slaughtered and eaten every bit And this was the 1960s.The Moso is an ethnic group that has a matri I first learned of Chinese pop singer Namu when she was quoted in the New York Times as offering to marry French President Nicolas Sarkozy So, I Googled her and this book was a prominent mention there, and in a recent New York Times profile.This is a fascinating look at an old Chinese Tibetan ethnic group so isolated Namu writes of dirt floors, and the pig living in the courtyard before he s slaughtered and eaten every bit And this was the 1960s.The Moso is an ethnic group that has a matrilinear culture men are present Uncle So and So , but women are the head of the household, own the property, and look to increase the family It s not matriarchal as opposed to patriarchal, but there are few such ethnic groups in the world some Native American tribes were matrilinear.Namu, however, rebeled against this, and ran off to music conservatory school, although she had no money, and was illiterate She became a popular nightclub singer in the 1980s as the China opened up, and now she s throwing her weight into tourism as a way to being currency to the Lagu Lake area where she was raised.You have to believe, otherwise a cynic would say how could she remember what she was thinking when she was four years old And illiterate until her 20s, and to write this She had help from the Australian academic who has studied the Moso culture, Christine Mathieu.It s a good read as counterpoint to the American materialistic, educated, decadent society we ve know for centuries this was an amazing story i gave it four stars because i did not find the writing all that great but the story is incredible and a real inspiration about a young girl from Moso country, a matrilinial society the concepts in this woman s culture were so hard for me to imagine actually existing a culture in which, for instance, young women have sex and babies with various men of their choosing , and then let them know when they don t feel like seeing them again a culture where men never li this was an amazing story i gave it four stars because i did not find the writing all that great but the story is incredible and a real inspiration about a young girl from Moso country, a matrilinial society the concepts in this woman s culture were so hard for me to imagine actually existing a culture in which, for instance, young women have sex and babies with various men of their choosing , and then let them know when they don t feel like seeing them again a culture where men never live with or marry women, but women create their own households that are passed down from grandmother to mother to daughter s i found myself reading this book feeling like i had so much re learning to do as a woman, and so much i wished for my daughter to experience as a girl that was already getting squashed, even in our equal culture here in the U.S the subtlety of female oppression was very apparent reading this book a great story, in the end, overall Wow, this was fascinating stuff A teenage girl from China s minority Mosu culture, where women take lovers instead of marrying and everyone lives in extended matrilineal households, leaves for the bright lights of urban China to become a singer in the 80s It s refreshing, because she LOVES the outside world cars Hot showers Fashion magazines But she also has great love and affection for her home, and is able finally to move between them Usually this kind of narrative ends with the concl Wow, this was fascinating stuff A teenage girl from China s minority Mosu culture, where women take lovers instead of marrying and everyone lives in extended matrilineal households, leaves for the bright lights of urban China to become a singer in the 80s It s refreshing, because she LOVES the outside world cars Hot showers Fashion magazines But she also has great love and affection for her home, and is able finally to move between them Usually this kind of narrative ends with the conclusion that modern life sucks, but you can t go home again Also, the anthropological detail her cowriter is an anthropologist who studies the Moso is FASCINATING.There s a lengthy afterword by Christine Mathieu, the anthropologist cowriter, about her work with the Mosu, and her acquaintance with Yang Namu I took months to read the first 10% of this book and I don t know why I read the last 90% this week and the memoir is in the top 10 books I have read in 2019 It is in the top 5 memoirs I have ever read Why Namu is one of the most unique women I have ever encountered She stood out among her people and culture and stands out among women in general She gives us a remarkable vision of the Moso Mosuo ethnic minority from the Luguhu Lake region bordering Yunnan and Sichuan provinces in China I took months to read the first 10% of this book and I don t know why I read the last 90% this week and the memoir is in the top 10 books I have read in 2019 It is in the top 5 memoirs I have ever read Why Namu is one of the most unique women I have ever encountered She stood out among her people and culture and stands out among women in general She gives us a remarkable vision of the Moso Mosuo ethnic minority from the Luguhu Lake region bordering Yunnan and Sichuan provinces in China This book kept me Googling for maps, videos and images of the culture it describes Every bit of it was unique vastly different than any culture I have read about Namu, herself is a unique woman markedly different by her own admission from traditional Moso Her story is compelling Many reviewers and some on line references suggest the memoir is vastly exaggerated, but Namu is still living and there is a historical trail that confirms most of her history Is it embellished Maybe, but all memoirs have some bias and selective memories No doubt Namu has a self image that holds herself unique, distinct, special relative to other Moso But I believe she is She left this remote region and has had a very successful and exceptional life That is what makes this memoir cowritten by an anthropologist and expert in Moso culture, Christine Mathieu so engrossing It tells the tale of one bad ass woman from an entire culture made up of bad ass women And it turns our idea of what a family can and should be on end It suggests, no it confirmsthan one type of family structure is relevant and enduring This books makes the reader think about possibilities and challenges preconceptions It is a reason to read.P.S This is the second book I read this year written from the point of view of a Chinese ethnic minority About 7% of the 1.4 billion Chinese people are non Han minorities, of which I believe 56 distinct groups are recognized and interestingly the Moso are not, but instead lumped with the Naxi Lisa See s The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane is explores the Akha ethnic minority and is equally interesting Both the Akha and Moso have remarkably unique compared to western norms family structure, culture and views on sexuality While See s book is a novel, it is very well researched Both books cover relationships between mothers and daughters in culturally insightful and thought provoking ways A third book I read this year, also by Lisa See, The Island of Sea Women, while set in Korea as opposed to China, is another such exploration Reading all three together or in close proximity enhances the experience of reading one in isolation The three books together would be a compelling collection to receive for Mother s Day Some books just capture you with content This is how it was when I opened the pages of Leaving Mother Lake.I read this book just before a trip to Lugu Lake, the Country of Women where Yang Erche Namu grew up It brought the culture alive for me It has been said that Yang Erche exoticized the lifestyle of the Mosuo Indeed, it s true, there is much less of the traditional walking marriage lifestyle she writes about Nonetheless, I thought the book provided a very good background to the still Some books just capture you with content This is how it was when I opened the pages of Leaving Mother Lake.I read this book just before a trip to Lugu Lake, the Country of Women where Yang Erche Namu grew up It brought the culture alive for me It has been said that Yang Erche exoticized the lifestyle of the Mosuo Indeed, it s true, there is much less of the traditional walking marriage lifestyle she writes about Nonetheless, I thought the book provided a very good background to the still very beautiful and remote region we visited.Even if you re not planning to visit, I d highly recommend this book It provides an engaging insight into a way of life and culture many of us cannot imagine