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{Read Epub} ⚢ Midnight's Children ⚠ Saleem Sinai was born at midnight, the midnight of India s independence, and found himself mysteriously handcuffed to history by the coincidence He is one of , children born at the midnight hour, each of them endowed with an extraordinary talent and whose privilege and curse it is to be both master and victims of their times Through Saleem s gifts inner ear and wildly sensitive sense of smell we are drawn into a fascinating family saga set against the vast, colourful background of the India of the th century I am the sum total of everything that went before me, of all I have been seen done, of everything done to me I am everyone everything whose being in the world affected was affected by mine I am anything that happens after I m gone which would not have happened if I had not comeSalman Rushdie, Midnight s Children I pull up a chair and ready myself I had, after all, been promised a fantastical story of the children of midnight The air crackles with electricity as the story unfoldsI am the sum total of everything that went before me, of all I have been seen done, of everything done to me I am everyone everything whose being in the world affected was affected by mine I am anything that happens after I m gone which would not have happened if I had not comeSalman Rushdie, Midnight s Children I pull up a chair and ready myself I had, after all, been promised a fantastical story of the children of midnight The air crackles with electricity as the story unfolds where it all began, in the dreamlike land of Kashmir where a fledgling doctor falls in love seven inches at a time Saleem Sinai, the narrator, weaves a wondrous tale, and I listen with rapt attention as I m drawn into the winding history of the Aziz family an account of supreme importance because without it the destiny of Saleem could never be fully realized Saleem s grandfather, Aadam Aziz, is a starry eyed youth aching to make a name for himself as a physician The fates have plans beyond imagining for this newly qualified medic Mix together a landowner s ill daughter, a poorly lit bedroom, and a giant sheet held as a modesty curtain between doctor and patient On this sheet is a hole, seven inches in diameter, cut into its center through which he must examine the young lady Sprinkle liberally with a magical realism so delicious that I was left light headed Stir well and let the concoction simmer over the low heat of mystery and the table is laid for generations to come Midnight s Children is a tale of love, betrayal and lust on every conceivable level Humor, interspersed with tragedy, fashions the perfect bite Within these pages, we find a poetic, long haired husband hidden in a crawlspace, a movie starlet with a suicidal spouse, and a man with a hair part so crisp that women can t control their desire for him I mean, who doesn t go wild over a great hair part, right Then there are the children born in the midnight hour those mystic beings filled with the disease of optimism the dreamers of dreams, made of knees and noses, noses and knees It feels as if Rushdie writes down the story just as he thinks of it, leaving it there in all its naked glory Like a recording of a conversation with a friend that includes any unforeseen interruptions As Rushdie s skittish mind conjures the narrative, he imagines other visitors stopping by the house and so they too become part of the yarn I absolutely loved the narrator s companion, Padma, prodding him to quit veering off course and get back to the task at hand because we both want to know what is going to happen I cheered her for keeping him on track several times The conversational writing style is an enchanting part of what makes this author a cut above, in addition to his rich lyrical prose The man is an artist with words, painting pictures so vivid that they became burned into my memory for all timeI was, however, powerless to protest we were swept into her Datsun of vengeance nevertheless, while we lived in her Guru Mandir mansion, she fed us the birianis of dissension and the nargisi koftas of discord I cracked the cover expecting greatness and, by the time I turned the final page, felt a part of the Aziz family If you ve not read Rushdie, please start with this chaotically brilliant book Midnight s Children captured my imagination and left me breathless A big thank you to Kevin Ansbro for his recommendation Midnight s Children is not at all a fast read it actually walks the line of being unpleasantly the opposite The prose is dense and initially frustrating in a way that seems almost deliberate, with repeated instances of the narrator rambling ahead to a point that he feels is important but then, before revealing anything of importance, deciding that things ought to come in their proper order This use of digressions or, better put, quarter digressions can either be attributed to a charmingly Midnight s Children is not at all a fast read it actually walks the line of being unpleasantly the opposite The prose is dense and initially frustrating in a way that seems almost deliberate, with repeated instances of the narrator rambling ahead to a point that he feels is important but then, before revealing anything of importance, deciding that things ought to come in their proper order This use of digressions or, better put, quarter digressions can either be attributed to a charmingly distractable narrator or a vehicle for perhaps cheaply tantalizing the reader or both.I ll admit that at first I didn t appreciate being so persistently manipulated Many times in the first few chapters I found myself closing the book in anger, thinking to myself If the story is worth it, this tactic is utterly unnecessary The tactic, it turns out, is unnecessary The book the story is stunning It s stunning enough that the frustrating aspects of the telling are forgivable and actually retrospectively satisfying which I suspect is what the author wanted While the fractional digressions, on the one hand, can have you groping around for a lighter they, on the other hand, work to accustom you to the novel s epically meandering pace Also, they effectively allow you to feel a certain urgency near the end of the book, as the narrator runs out of time The imagery is lush the characters are curiously, magically lopsided the language is complicated and beautiful the chapters are nicely portioned despite the initial plodding pace the narrative is deliberately allegorical, which perhaps suggests an enhanced enjoyment of the work after studying a bit of Indian history Elements of the story s frame the narrator writing in a pickle factory with sweet Padma reading along are particularly amusing, and the chapter entitled In the Sundarbans is nothing short of breathtaking.The book will go slow in the beginning the book means to give it patience it s worth it, I think Midnight s Children is an absolute masterful piece of writing It is entertaining, intelligent, informative, progressive and even funny it is an astoundingly well balanced epic that captures the birth of a new independent nation I hold it in such high regard The children are all fractured and divided they are born into a new country that is yet to define itself in the wake of colonialism it has no universal language, religion or culture The children reflect this they are spread out and Midnight s Children is an absolute masterful piece of writing It is entertaining, intelligent, informative, progressive and even funny it is an astoundingly well balanced epic that captures the birth of a new independent nation I hold it in such high regard The children are all fractured and divided they are born into a new country that is yet to define itself in the wake of colonialism it has no universal language, religion or culture The children reflect this they are spread out and unconnected to each other As such Rushdie raises a critical question does India even exist These children are born on the night of India s independence, but what exactly are they born into The mass of land they occupy is yet to establish what it now is it is something new, a place with an internal battle raging between modernisation and tradition It s not the India it was the day before, and it s certainly not the India it was before the colonisers cameWhat s real and what s true aren t necessarily the sameSaleem, our narrator and protagonist, reflects this He is a hybrid, born into two worlds He has powers, powers that allow him to connect telepathically with the other children born into the new nation They all have their own gifts and they all represent an infectious optimism, a powerful hope that things will start to get better Their progress in the story, their successes and failures, reflect the development of the new India As Saleem begins to fall apart, as he begins to lose himself, the optimism begins to shatter and things go terribly wrong war approaches, death approaches Rushdie plays around with reality, warping it and twisting it to the point where its very nature becomes an allegory for the failings of society The India he has created is both removed and part of the real world He has used human terms, and human emotions, to personify a country Through this he demonstrates how it can waver and falter and how it can fail and become a victim to its own passions It s an exceedingly clever device Saleem is egotistical and unreliable, but his life is a physical manifestation of post independent India On a character level he actually thinks he is altering events, though he only ever mirrors itMemory s truth, because memory has its own special kind It selects, eliminates, alters, exaggerates, minimizes, glorifies, and vilifies also but in the end it creates its own reality, its heterogeneous but usually coherent version of events and no sane human being ever trusts someone else s versionthan his own All great literature should be subjective All great literature should have a multitude of ramifications If we go away with one single clean cut meaning or interpretation then the author has failed to some degree Literature needs to make us think it needs to make us question the world and our place within it And Rushdie certainly does that You may disagree with my reading I think Midnight s Children can be seen in a number of different ways, and I d love to hear what other people thought it all meant There s just so much going on in this book, I could literally write several essays on it Rushdie draws heavily on M rquez s One Hundred Years of Solitude by recreating the long drawn out family saga told in the magical realist mode to represent reality in atruthful way than standard story telling would allow however, Rushdie transcends it in so many ways I will be reading The Satanic Verses very soon I think, and I will definitely be writing on Rushdie for my university work This is clearly one of the most important novels written in the last fifty years This is my absolute favourite Rushdie novel Its background of the Partition of India and Pakistan after the disastrous and cowardly retreat of the British occupiers and the ensuing Emergency under Indira Ghandi provides a breathtaking tableau for Rushdie s narrative His narrator is completely unreliable and that is what makes the story so fascinating I lend this book out so many times after talking about it so much and never got my paperback copy returned that I had to buy a hardcover that This is my absolute favourite Rushdie novel Its background of the Partition of India and Pakistan after the disastrous and cowardly retreat of the British occupiers and the ensuing Emergency under Indira Ghandi provides a breathtaking tableau for Rushdie s narrative His narrator is completely unreliable and that is what makes the story so fascinating I lend this book out so many times after talking about it so much and never got my paperback copy returned that I had to buy a hardcover that I would no longer lend out so as not to lose it any It was the first time I read a book with this kind of narration mostly having had the omniscient, distant 3rd party narrator or the interior dialog or stream of consciousness 1st person narrator and this was a revelation for me which later led me to read DFW, Pynchon and other post modern writers with relish A fantastic 20th C masterpiece I used to talk about it all the time and lend it out and folks liked it so much that I kept having to replace my paperback copy At one point, I got fed up and bought a hardcover that I don t lend out any The backdrop of the horrors of the partition of India and Pakistan, bungled so badly by the United Kingdom s cowardly retreat leaving a chaotic bloody vacuum in 48, is already compelling but what really makes this novel so fascinating for me is the unreliable narration It was the first book I read where the first person narrator was a known liar and so you could not always believe what he said In terms of writing and narration, this was quite a revelation to me who was used to the omniscient and neutral 3rd person narrator or the deep stream of conscious first person narrator I found it fast paced and extremely well written If you have never read Rushdie before, this is where I would suggest you start