( Download Book ) ♷ Outcast of Redwall ⚖ MOBI eBook or Kindle ePUB free

For most of my childhood, I was utterly in love with the world of Redwall.Brian Jacques has a gift for storytelling, describing battles and feasts in equal meticulous detail, and it paints an enchanting picture for any reader.But the strength of the series aside hell This is one of the most unfair, even racist, books I ve ever read It makes a mockery of the nature vs nurture debate, and the vermin namesake of the book is seen as an irredeemably evil character, even when he s just a baby Ser For most of my childhood, I was utterly in love with the world of Redwall.Brian Jacques has a gift for storytelling, describing battles and feasts in equal meticulous detail, and it paints an enchanting picture for any reader.But the strength of the series aside hell This is one of the most unfair, even racist, books I ve ever read It makes a mockery of the nature vs nurture debate, and the vermin namesake of the book is seen as an irredeemably evil character, even when he s just a baby Seriously What kind of kid are Redwallers expecting to raise when their first reactions to an abandoned baby ferret are along the lines of I don t like the looks of this one It ll be evil, mark my words Great, Brian Jacques Just because someone looks different, they must be evil What kind of message are you supposed to be sending to kids here PS Veil the ferret really doesn t get much page time in this book anyway It s essentially the story of the Mary Sue of all Badger lords, Sunflash, and his pet bird Yawn To the adventurous pretties,The end of this Redwall book was particularly sad to me While previous books have had really happy atmospheres Que reading slump The end was left neutral, and felt precarious That s all for today Ta ta,shizuku I appreciated this book s clear departure from Jacques typical formulaic Redwall plot, and appreciated evenits foray into moral complexity This was the first perhaps it remained the only Redwall book which explored the possibility that the evil predatory scavenger species of Redwall s sentient animal world were capable of reform, growth, and transformation That perhaps their inclination toward vile behavior owed muchto their upbringing within abusive, marauding cultures, or e I appreciated this book s clear departure from Jacques typical formulaic Redwall plot, and appreciated evenits foray into moral complexity This was the first perhaps it remained the only Redwall book which explored the possibility that the evil predatory scavenger species of Redwall s sentient animal world were capable of reform, growth, and transformation That perhaps their inclination toward vile behavior owed muchto their upbringing within abusive, marauding cultures, or even prejudicial cultures, than it did to their genes.Moral complexity was badly wanted in Redwall stories up till this point It is often lacking in high adventure stories in general, even from books written for older audiences Bravo to Jacques for taking it on in a middle grade fantasy novel, and for doing a profoundly good job Emotions run deep in this story, as characters must decide repeatedly what price is worth paying for true friendship, and work out how to recognize good and evil in their companions As a child, I cried reading this book.All three times This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here A young stoat is taken in by the saintly woodland creatures of Redwall, who raise him as best they can But his true nature is always making itself known he plays lots of cruel pranks and keeps lying and stealing At last, he runs away to seek his fortune elsewhere The story follows several Redwall creatures as they go off on their own adventure eventually they encounter the earstwhile stoat once , who has joined with a band of ruffians Fighting ensues, and the stoat throws himself int A young stoat is taken in by the saintly woodland creatures of Redwall, who raise him as best they can But his true nature is always making itself known he plays lots of cruel pranks and keeps lying and stealing At last, he runs away to seek his fortune elsewhere The story follows several Redwall creatures as they go off on their own adventure eventually they encounter the earstwhile stoat once , who has joined with a band of ruffians Fighting ensues, and the stoat throws himself into the path of an arrow to save his foster mother THEY DO NOT MOURN HIM Because, you see, he didn t really mean to save her he was just acting impulsively as always WTF Years later, just thinking about the unfairness of this book drives me to clench my fists with rage I have never read another Redwall book ( Download Book ) ♷ Outcast of Redwall ☩ Abandoned as an infant by his father, the evil warlord Swartt Sixclaw, Veil is raised by the kindhearted Bryony Despite concerns from everyone at Redwall, Bryony is convinced that Veil s goodness will prevail But when he commits a crime that is unforgivable, he is banished from the abbey forever Then Swartt and his hordes of searats and vermin attack Redwall, and Veil has to decide Should he join Swartt in battle against the only creature who has ever loved him Or should he turn his back on his true father The past summer I decided to re read some of this series I remembered loving it in grade school, and The Outcast of Redwall was my favorite book of the series I remember reading it several times as a kid, but upon rereading it in college, I couldn t figure out why There were several unlikable characters Bryony comes to mind , the philosophy of all of carnivora is EEEEVVIILLLL, except badgers and otters for some reason, and that one cat from Mossflower continued unchecked, despite the poten The past summer I decided to re read some of this series I remembered loving it in grade school, and The Outcast of Redwall was my favorite book of the series I remember reading it several times as a kid, but upon rereading it in college, I couldn t figure out why There were several unlikable characters Bryony comes to mind , the philosophy of all of carnivora is EEEEVVIILLLL, except badgers and otters for some reason, and that one cat from Mossflower continued unchecked, despite the potential in the title, and despite the title, Veil got almost no actual presence When he did, it was usually from the perspective of those around him rather than his own, so we rarely get a chance to get inside the character Instead, he came off as a petulant brat who got what he deserved Going to steal stuff and poison people Yes, in a civilized society you SHOULD be held responsible for those actions This pretty much sums up my adult view of the book, as well as many others it seems But what made it so endearing as a child Why was I rooting for Veil then, and despising him now It took me almost 6 months to realize that as an adult I was typecasting him and ignoring what HE was saying I ve grown muchdiscriminating and less accepting, no doubt as a result of age and experience, though undesirable As a child, I was listening to Veil s voice, not that of the Badgermum At one point Veil asks some friar why he s always getting blamed for things going missing and the problems Bryony supports him, claiming they always blamed Veil from the time he was a Dibbun Back then, this is what I picked up on the Redwallers really DIDN T give him a chance I filled in the blanks for Veil then all the times he was excluded from games with the other dibbuns because he was different, all the times he was chastised farseverely than the others, many times unjustly Though, all we see as readers is the bratty Veil , and I believe this is a key flaw When the readers have to fill in the blank of always evil raised poorly and the cards are already stacked against him due to his species, it is far too easy to jump to the black and white or racist conclusion.That being said, I enjoyed the story of Sunflash farthe second time around Partly this was due to the fact that I already knew it would take up a good half of the book, and partly because I find badgers to be one of theinteresting species in the Redwall universe Its very true that the different species are strongly stereotyped as good or bad, but badgers seem to have a healthy dose of grey area due to their berserker rage and the accompanying burdens of typically assuming some form of leadership role Sunflash was by far one of the greatest and most complex characters in the series, despite being cast next to many of the least original and shallow characters Bryony and a whole mountain of hares Then, of course there is the villain I enjoyed Swartt a lotin 5th grade, probably because I couldn t recognize the fact that he was completely interchangeable with any other Redwall villain Well, mostly To be fair, he was probably one of the only villains with a good reason for going on a campaign of war due to his history with Sunflash, and he didn t obsess over Redwall as though it contained some kind of treasure or as if there really was a good reason to set a siege there There isn t It s just an abbey, and the only thing worth stealing is a tapestry, as we learned in both Redwall and Marlfox Even if he wasn t chased off by Skipper he probably wouldn t have been particularly interested, since Sunflash wasn t there The most annoying part though, was that even when he had chances to take on Sunflash, he preferred just tying him up so that he could escape later, and was too afraid of Sunflash to actually battle him one on one We also don t see him working on his fighting skills in preparation for the battle, or ANYTHING, so he really is never a good opponent for Sunflash Sunflash might not actively train either, but he s a badger much larger than Swartt, naturally stronger, and has berserker strength He doesn t need to train But if you re a ferret going to take THAT on, don t you think you d prepare a little better, instead of relying on a fox s woo woo nonsense Then again, Redwall villains are never that smart or tough, relying on numbers rather than wits Even theintelligent ones aren t as sharp as the dullest of the dibbuns most of the time.To conclude, I rated this four stars to average out both times I read it In fifth grade I would have given it 5 stars, today I would have given it 2,.5 for nostalgia 4 stars This one pissed me off I liked itwhen I was younger, but after rereading it, I can t ignore some of its serious flaws An orphaned ferret baby Veil is raised by kind Redwallers who emotionally abuse him and constantly discriminate against him, then kick him out His adopted mother, the only mouse who didn t hate him, follows him as he sets out to find his father, the evil warlord Swartt Sixclaw, who abandoned him He finds his father, the mouse finds them, the Swartt throws a spear at t This one pissed me off I liked itwhen I was younger, but after rereading it, I can t ignore some of its serious flaws An orphaned ferret baby Veil is raised by kind Redwallers who emotionally abuse him and constantly discriminate against him, then kick him out His adopted mother, the only mouse who didn t hate him, follows him as he sets out to find his father, the evil warlord Swartt Sixclaw, who abandoned him He finds his father, the mouse finds them, the Swartt throws a spear at the mouse in an attempt to kill her, then Veil jumps in front of the spear and gives his life to save his adpoted mother Then the mouse realizes that her adopted son was pure evil after he sacrificed his own life to save hers WTF I didn t like the good guys because they were prejudiced and their behavior can t be excused This book shows a negative side of the Redwall inhabitants though I don t think this was intentional , but I think the reader is supposed to accept that the Redwallers were right to treat the ferret the way they did and he was evil only because he was a ferret, and it had nothing to do with his horrible upbringing This book had a lot of potential to explore the nature v nurture debate, but failed terribly Could the ferret have been good if he had been raised by kind, loving creatures We ll never know.I give it one star because I hated the storyline about the outcast, and the storyline between the Sunflash the badger and the ferret warlord which took up the majority of the book, despite its title was equally enraging I hate it when fictional characters do idiotic things that no one would do in real life This happens here when Swartt captures Sunflash but doesn t kill him when he had the chance Instead, he ties up the badger, then the badger escapes and immediately kills the ferret.In conclusion, I was disappointed Very disappointed One star Finally, fans of Redwall get to knowabout the badgers of Salamandastron A young badger is held captive by an evil ferret, Swartt Sixclaw Coincidence and bad weather brings the hawk, Skarlath to the camp of Sixclaw The badger and Skarlath help each other escape, but not before the badger seriously wounds the ferret warlord Skarlath names the badger Sunflash, and together they journey through Mossflower, helping those in need and making friends along the way But Swartt Sixclaw has vowed Finally, fans of Redwall get to knowabout the badgers of Salamandastron A young badger is held captive by an evil ferret, Swartt Sixclaw Coincidence and bad weather brings the hawk, Skarlath to the camp of Sixclaw The badger and Skarlath help each other escape, but not before the badger seriously wounds the ferret warlord Skarlath names the badger Sunflash, and together they journey through Mossflower, helping those in need and making friends along the way But Swartt Sixclaw has vowed to avenge his wounded paw, and builds an army to find and defeat Sunflash Back at Redwall Abbey, the peaceful creatures take in an orphaned baby ferret, unbeknownst to them, the only son of Swartt Sixclaw Hard as they try, the Redwallers, and a young mousemaid named Bryony who is responsible for the young ferret, are unable to show Veil how to live peacefully True to Jacques style, the stories of Sunflash and the Redwallers intertwine, and the reader is lead on a journey of fierce friendship, loyalty, fate and the battle of good vs evil I will be honest when I say that this book actually pissed me off when I read it Mr Jacques had a great opportunity here, to take one of his traditionally evil creatures and let him be a good guy To break the conventions of his other stories and to do something different And Veil does try, through most of the story, to be good I could almost feel him fighting the author through much of the early part of the book But no, in the end his evil side wins out, and he turns out to be no better I will be honest when I say that this book actually pissed me off when I read it Mr Jacques had a great opportunity here, to take one of his traditionally evil creatures and let him be a good guy To break the conventions of his other stories and to do something different And Veil does try, through most of the story, to be good I could almost feel him fighting the author through much of the early part of the book But no, in the end his evil side wins out, and he turns out to be no better than his genetics made him The lesson that he wants to give here seems to be that, no matter who raises you, or what you strive to be in life, in the end the world will conspire against you and you will never be able to be better than your parents.And I liked the Redwall books, I really did, and I still really enjoy several of them This was one of the low points in the series, the entire thing feels like a wasted opportunity at the end, much like Veil himself Another stirring adventure for the creatures of the idyllic Mossflower wood As previous reviewers have pointed out, the storylines do get a little repetitive however I don t expect the youthful audience the books are aimed at, would be too troubled with that just as long as there are heroes and heroines, warriors and pirates, goodies and baddies, and lots of scrumptious feasts to fill the long, sun drenched, bucolic days