EBOOK ê Rad Dad: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Fatherhood ⚣ eBook or Kindle ePUB free

EBOOK ⚜ Rad Dad: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Fatherhood ì Combining the best of the award winning magazine Rad Dad and the Daddy Dialectic blog, this compilation features the best essays written for fathers by a multitude of dads from different walks of life Bestselling authors, writers, musicians, and others collaborate on this collection that focuses on some of the modern complexities of fatherhood Touching on topics such as the brutalities, beauties, and politics of the birth experience the challenges of parenting on an equal basis with mothers the tests faced by transgendered and gay fathers the emotions of sperm donation and parental confrontations with war, violence, racism, and incarceration, this anthology leaves no stone unturned in the discussion of being a dad Contributors include Steve Almond, Jack Amoureux, Mike Araujo, Mark Andersen, Jeff Chang, Ta Nehisi Coates, Jeff Conant, Jason Denzin, Cory Doctorow, Craig Elliott, Chip Gagnon, Keith Hennessy, David L Hoyt, Simon Knapus, Ian MacKaye, Tomas Moniz, Zappa Montag, Raj Patel, Jeremy Adam Smith, Jason Sperber, Burke Stansbury, Shawn Taylor, Tata, Jeff West, and Mark Whiteley A genuinely thoughtful collection of diverse in every sense advice for raising children as a father I appreciated a few things about this, over other dad guides that I ve had the please and often displeasure to read The first was the focus on political consciousness in parenting many of the contributors are activists, or members of historically marginalized communities All of them are conscious of the degree to which masculinity and patriarchy structure fatherhood and childhood The pol A genuinely thoughtful collection of diverse in every sense advice for raising children as a father I appreciated a few things about this, over other dad guides that I ve had the please and often displeasure to read The first was the focus on political consciousness in parenting many of the contributors are activists, or members of historically marginalized communities All of them are conscious of the degree to which masculinity and patriarchy structure fatherhood and childhood The politics is left leaning, but not preachy or didactic Instead, there s a genuine attempt to wrestle with and live out the contradictions of what it means to be a father in a society that says fathers must look like the traditional and suspect image of the 1950s patriarch, whether you in fact look like that or not The second builds from the first, and sits in the insistence that fatherhood is ultimately improvisational, not in the sense of every action being completely new, but in the sense of being a thing to be worked out using the tools you have, or against the tools you were given by your parents This was comforting, in a lot of ways, because everyone is trying to do better than what they were given with parenthood, and everyone feels themselves failing in some degree, either when measured against an idealized politics, or just in the daily working out of trying to be a good parent It made me feel in solidarity with other parents, part of the same struggle The third is that parenting can galvanize one s politics and materially ground them in ways that are transformative Many authors spoke of the ways having kids brought home the necessity of political action around childcare, healthcare, environmental activism, and educational activism The mundane truism that having kids changes you can mean a lot of things, and the contributors here frequently suggest that it made themengaged in their politics, if sometimes less able to act on that engagement Not every essay was riveting or illuminating, but all of them were well written, and by equal turns funny, sad, or brilliant A great book for dads, or any parent trying to figure out how to raise kids and save the world Reading this book made me realize that raising my daughter or son is going to be the ultimate test of my feminism, that fatherhood can be and is a political act While I know I can t control who my children will grow up to be nor how just the world can be , I can show them how important it is that they fight for a better world and a better self.As a man and a feminist, I ve come to understand my role in making that better world and that it is found in my day to day interactions with young Reading this book made me realize that raising my daughter or son is going to be the ultimate test of my feminism, that fatherhood can be and is a political act While I know I can t control who my children will grow up to be nor how just the world can be , I can show them how important it is that they fight for a better world and a better self.As a man and a feminist, I ve come to understand my role in making that better world and that it is found in my day to day interactions with young people whether they are my students, neighborhood children, my niece, or my future kids Since our culture is in dire need of new myths of gender that will counteract the ones that tell little girls they need to look pretty to be good or that tell little boys that being aggressive is just being a man, Rad Dad and the similar books that will soon follow are essential Books like this one redesign who a father is and dispels the notion that fathers should be hands off breadwinners or diaper fumbling dopes.This book is equally about dispelling what feminism is, at a time when so many young adults continue to view feminism as some undesirable extreme But no, being a feminist and a man, and a father is about believing in the possibilities of aequitable,just,free world I think I have found a new community to join Viva la Rad Dad I had pretty high hopes for this book, as it claims to combine two things that I m really fascinated by masculinity studies and feminist parenting But the majority of the essays didn t live up to the promise of exploring how men can parent in ultimately revolutionary ways A lot were written by privileged anarchybros who didn t even begin to take a critical perspective, and I felt slightly to intensely annoyed through most of the book There were a few good essays, though, and it s a quick r I had pretty high hopes for this book, as it claims to combine two things that I m really fascinated by masculinity studies and feminist parenting But the majority of the essays didn t live up to the promise of exploring how men can parent in ultimately revolutionary ways A lot were written by privileged anarchybros who didn t even begin to take a critical perspective, and I felt slightly to intensely annoyed through most of the book There were a few good essays, though, and it s a quick read So I rate it somewhere between 2 and 2.5 stars Um, probably the best book i ever read