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!Download ♆ Teacher Man ☦ McCourt s long awaited book about how his thirty year teaching career shaped his second act as a writerNearly a decade ago Frank McCourt became an unlikely star when, at the age of sixty six, he burst onto the literary scene with Angela s Ashes, the Pulitzer Prize winning memoir of his childhood in Limerick, Ireland Then came Tis, his glorious account of his early years in New YorkNow, here at last, is McCourt s long awaited book about how his thirty year teaching career shaped his second act as a writer Teacher Man is also an urgent tribute to teachers everywhere In bold and spirited prose featuring his irreverent wit and heartbreaking honesty, McCourt records the trials, triumphs and surprises he faces in public high schools around New York City His methods anything but conventional, McCourt creates a lasting impact on his students through imaginative assignments he instructs one class to write An Excuse Note from Adam or Eve to God , singalongs featuring recipe ingredients as lyrics , and field trips imagine taking twenty nine rowdy girls to a movie in Times SquareMcCourt struggles to find his way in the classroom and spends his evenings drinking with writers and dreaming of one day putting his own story to paper Teacher Man shows McCourt developing his unparalleled ability to tell a great story as, five days a week, five periods per day, he works to gain the attention and respect of unruly, hormonally charged or indifferent adolescents McCourt s rocky marriage, his failed attempt to get a PhD at Trinity College, Dublin, and his repeated firings due to his propensity to talk back to his superiors ironically lead him to New York s most prestigious school, Stuyvesant High School, where he finally finds a place and a voice Doggedness, he says, is not as glamorous as ambition or talent or intellect or charm, but still the one thing that got me through the days and nights For McCourt, storytelling itself is the source of salvation, and in Teacher Man the journey to redemption and literary fame is an exhilarating adventure A very different book to Angela s Ashes It s like listening to a witty, self deprecating yet passionate man tell you stories of his life You can even hear his accent McCourt talks about his time as a teacher how it came about, his successes and failures, his talent for telling stories In other hands, this could read as one long ego trip But this man is, was, a master storyteller He draws you in with his confidences and asides, making you believe you re sharing his secrets I met Susan Jan A very different book to Angela s Ashes It s like listening to a witty, self deprecating yet passionate man tell you stories of his life You can even hear his accent McCourt talks about his time as a teacher how it came about, his successes and failures, his talent for telling stories In other hands, this could read as one long ego trip But this man is, was, a master storyteller He draws you in with his confidences and asides, making you believe you re sharing his secrets I met Susan Jane Gilman a couple of years ago She s a successful writer of memoir and funny anecdotes that had me snorting in hog like fashion She was one of Frank s students at Stuyvesant High School and talked about him with such enthusiasm I just had to read his side of the experience So I smiled when I came to this line in Teacher Man Susan Gilman never raises her hand Everything is too urgent The other thing that appealed to me throughout this book is his clear belief in firing young minds with the value of imagination He loved sharing his enthusiasm for literature and writing, and it s evident from these pages that he was a terrific teacher This is a gentle read, filled with quietly emotional moments which make you smile, nod and choke up I d love to have been in his Creative Writing class My fourth book by Frank McCourt and I am still impressed Teacher Man 2005 is the last book of his 3 part tragicomic memoir and it is about his experiences as a teacher in at least 3 schools in New York He spent 33 years teaching high school students before he retired at the age of 60 and wrote his first book, Angela s Ashes at the age of 66 The book changed his life tremendously He won a Pulitzer in 1997 National Book Critics Circle Award in 1996 He met President Bush, Lady Diana and othe My fourth book by Frank McCourt and I am still impressed Teacher Man 2005 is the last book of his 3 part tragicomic memoir and it is about his experiences as a teacher in at least 3 schools in New York He spent 33 years teaching high school students before he retired at the age of 60 and wrote his first book, Angela s Ashes at the age of 66 The book changed his life tremendously He won a Pulitzer in 1997 National Book Critics Circle Award in 1996 He met President Bush, Lady Diana and other well known personalities because of it However, looking back, what he most treasured in his life was the opportunity to influence the many future American citizens The schools were he taught at vocational and technical school McKee , adult education teaching English to immigrants mostly mothers New York City College of Technology and later in the Harvard equivalent for high school in the US Stuyvesant High School where only the brightest high students are admitted So, McCourt had enough challenges and to be able to survive that long means that he must have loved teaching Afterall, teaching is said to be one of the noblest professions.Although there is almost nothing about Ireland and his poor family background in this book, his funny and witty lines are still much evident I particularly enjoyed his conversations with his students particularly the immigrants who did not know much about literature and grammar Those poor immigrants who came to America during that time early 70 s to late 80 s barely knew English and thought of themselves as nobody and McCourt took patience in turning that wrong belief around They ended up liking William Shakespeare and appreciating Hamlet Something that I can relate with since I have not read Hamlet yet.Ah, four lovely lovely books It was nice knowing you, Frank McCourt I will now read those two books Singing My Him Song and A Monk Swimming by your brother Malachy McCourt born 1931 and 1 book A Long Stone s Throw 1998 by Alphie McCourt born 1940 I wonder if these younger brothers of yours are also as brilliant as you are when it comes to writing memoirs At first, I was a little disappointed, because the book went by so fast He summed up 30 years of teaching in a little over 200 pages.Then, when I thought about it, I realized how much it made sense I ve only been teaching for five years, and at times, it feels like forever, but at the same time, it s gone by so fast I think McCourt captured that perfectly.Also, I love his self deprecating humor There are many times when I feel like a fraud as a teacher, but I know that if I tried to write li At first, I was a little disappointed, because the book went by so fast He summed up 30 years of teaching in a little over 200 pages.Then, when I thought about it, I realized how much it made sense I ve only been teaching for five years, and at times, it feels like forever, but at the same time, it s gone by so fast I think McCourt captured that perfectly.Also, I love his self deprecating humor There are many times when I feel like a fraud as a teacher, but I know that if I tried to write like McCourt, I d come off sounding whiny He manages to do it sounding sincere I read this book years ago, at the start of my teaching career I can t remember if I was student teaching or if it was my first year, but nevertheless, I was a newbie I actually started reading it again forgetting this was the Frank McCourt book I had read years ago It took me about two pages to realize my mistake, but I figured I might as well finish it since I hadn t even remembered I had read it in the first place McCourt no doubt has some questionable pedagogy Some of his out of the box I read this book years ago, at the start of my teaching career I can t remember if I was student teaching or if it was my first year, but nevertheless, I was a newbie I actually started reading it again forgetting this was the Frank McCourt book I had read years ago It took me about two pages to realize my mistake, but I figured I might as well finish it since I hadn t even remembered I had read it in the first place McCourt no doubt has some questionable pedagogy Some of his out of the box lessons are clever while others are downright ridiculous He wrote he felt guilty not sticking to the curriculum, but I suppose sometimes it takes risks to discover gold I feel a little cheated because we never get to experience a typical day in his classroomthere s no way he had his students reciting recipes every day throughout his decades of teaching What did a regular day look like He had to have touched on some of the curriculum throughout the year, but I suppose those stories may not have been as engaging.What I did not appreciate was his manner regarding his marriage He nonchalantly writes about cheating on his wife, claiming that it was a marriage doomed from the start Ummm, when did that make it okay to have affairs And, what are these stories adding to this book The best part about the book is the stories about students and their lives I tell my students teachers are people, too but maybe we sometimes forget that the same applies to our students We see them in a bubble and make judgments based on their attentiveness in our class and their homework completion and perceived effort, but they have home lives and struggles, just like us Oh sure, with the troubled kids, you can clearly see that there are outside forces pulling them from being a motivated student, but what about the others I sometimes get jealous that other teachers get to knowabout their students outside worlds English teachers have papers, art teachers see their pieces rife with emotion, religion teachers have journalswhat about math teachers We get to see word problems It s hard to start deep, provocative discussions around the topic how to solve for x i hated this book i didn t like the style of his writing i didn t like the way he talked about his teaching and what he did in his classroom as i kept on reading, i was just like dude you are not a good teacher but maybe it s just the way he presented himself.when i got to the end, i was like so what was the point but i guess the point was that this is part of his life story. I really loved Angela s Ashes and Tis, but Teacher Man, Frank McCourt s third book, was easily my favourite Part of it was that, brilliant as they are, his first two book are heavy going I was exhausted at the end of each one Glad I had read them, but evenglad that we were at the end His childhood was hard and depressing and something no one should have to go through, but I d finish each book feeling almost overwhelmed by the fact that his childhood was unfortunately not uncommon C I really loved Angela s Ashes and Tis, but Teacher Man, Frank McCourt s third book, was easily my favourite Part of it was that, brilliant as they are, his first two book are heavy going I was exhausted at the end of each one Glad I had read them, but evenglad that we were at the end His childhood was hard and depressing and something no one should have to go through, but I d finish each book feeling almost overwhelmed by the fact that his childhood was unfortunately not uncommon Countless people have experienced something similar He wrote about it in a way that most of us could probably only dream of, and they are beautiful books that I recommend everyone read, but I was so pleased that we got to finish the story here This book focuses entirely on his teaching career, lessons taught and learned It s is wonderfully written, as is to be expected, but this one also felt lighter, a bit freer There is still darkness and self doubt and plenty of difficult things, but he is now at a point where he is doing something he is good at even if he worries that he isn t good at it and has a purpose in his life I finished this feeling so pleased that he became a teacher, and evenpleased that he decided to write about it I can think of few thing that are not life threatening , that intimidate methan the idea of having to stand in front of a class of teenagers and try to teach them, have them listen and understand As I think a lot of people are being reminded as they take over schooling during lockdown, not everyone can teach and it s even harder to be a good teacher As ever, I appreciated Frank McCourt s frankness here the things that worked, the things that didn t, the self doubt, the days when you just don t care But also the highs of a discussion where everyone participates, that breakthrough moment in helping someone to understand, the moments that make it worthwhile I had delayed starting this book because I wasn t sure I felt like reading another heavy volume, however stunning the writing may be I simply wasn t in the mood to feel such despair toward humanity I only have to look at the news right now to feel that For whatever reason though, I did start reading this, and it was a lovely addition to my day I spent a lot of time thinking about the excellent teachers I have been lucky enough to have over the years and also a lot of time being grateful for the book I was holding It turned out to be the perfect book to read right now, for me at least, and I m very thankful that I had a copy with me Highly recommended, but make sure you read Angela s Ashes first, then Tis, then this one McCourt has a compelling style of writing, an extraordinarily masculine style I don t know what this means exactly, but if I were ever to try to pin down what I thought made for masculine writing, I d definitely look at McCourt s book, if only to avoid the traditional recourse to Hemingway One thing that was nice about it was that it was a memoir that happened to be about a period in his life when he was a teacher i.e that happened to be about teaching It clearly wasn t a teacher mem McCourt has a compelling style of writing, an extraordinarily masculine style I don t know what this means exactly, but if I were ever to try to pin down what I thought made for masculine writing, I d definitely look at McCourt s book, if only to avoid the traditional recourse to Hemingway One thing that was nice about it was that it was a memoir that happened to be about a period in his life when he was a teacher i.e that happened to be about teaching It clearly wasn t a teacher memoir in the traditional sense.McCourt came off as a compelling teacher, because he is almost certainly a compelling storyteller and a compelling person to listen to It was clear he did some good things in his classroom But, to me at least, he didn t seem as annoyingly perfect or pedantic as other teachers I read in teacher school He also refreshingly refuses to analyze or justify many of his most compelling and strange moments of pedagogy There were almost certainly students who were ill served by McCourt and who couldn t stand him There were also years when I imagine he wasn t a very good teacher And, of course, there were surely many students he made a great impact on and manywho dearly loved him.In the end what drove this forward was the mixture of classic teacher man stories think Dead Poet Society and McCourt s brisk, snappy sections of teacher student dialog.I guess I also fundamentally share McCourt s main teaching insight, which is that it s hard to represent the system , that it makes sense when kids resist authority and that often you most sympathize and even like the very kids you have to reprimand for wasting the class s time This book is difficult to review While I appreciated McCourt s attempt to recognize teachers especially English teachers and the work often underappreciated that we do, I felt that his theory of if we all think outside the box and try to be friendly with our students, than we will have a successful teaching career, a bit unrealistic, overly idealistic, and in many ways, condescending While I do admire some of his methods, and enjoy his writing style, I found that the times when he let hi This book is difficult to review While I appreciated McCourt s attempt to recognize teachers especially English teachers and the work often underappreciated that we do, I felt that his theory of if we all think outside the box and try to be friendly with our students, than we will have a successful teaching career, a bit unrealistic, overly idealistic, and in many ways, condescending While I do admire some of his methods, and enjoy his writing style, I found that the times when he let his true sentiments show like telling a kid to stop being so ignorant and have some respect for the English language, or having days where you were just sick of whining teenagersdoes that make me mean or already jaded or when he simply let the student anecdotes speak for themselves, were my favorite parts of the book I do think this is ahonest perception of teaching especially the first part where he is working in the tougher schools during his first few years than many other movies I ve seen that try to portray teaching Some of the autobiographical stuff could have been left out too much information sometimes The first chapter of this book is so exquisite that I have caught myself rehearsing it as a possible public reading many times Mr McCourt describes his first day as a new teacher standing before a class of hardened urban students It bristles with irony and suspense comparable to great classic comedy scenes I read the book for the first time shortly after it was published, at the end of my first year as a teacher, and identified with Mr McCourt s predicament completely If only I had managed The first chapter of this book is so exquisite that I have caught myself rehearsing it as a possible public reading many times Mr McCourt describes his first day as a new teacher standing before a class of hardened urban students It bristles with irony and suspense comparable to great classic comedy scenes I read the book for the first time shortly after it was published, at the end of my first year as a teacher, and identified with Mr McCourt s predicament completely If only I had managed to respond to my situation with the humanity and wisdom he brought to his Throughout this memoir, Mr McCourt shares one anecdote after another to paint vivid pictures of the wonderfully idiomatic students he engaged over the years For many of these students, school as it is structured in modern America is largely disconnected from the rest of what comprises their reality As they are unable to draw a connection between school and that reality, they see no path through school to a better life, and they exercise apparently sound economic decision making by allocating minimal effort Mr McCourt s efforts to help students find a path through education to a better future were instructional and inspirational.This is a book that often comes up when teachers are together discussing their calling It paints a true picture of modern urban schools and provides relevant and important information about the challenges we face when we are called to leave no child behind The book can be an inspiration to those who teach in urban settings and a source of new understanding for those who puzzle at today s debate on education in America